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The Matthew effect in China’s science: evidence from academicians of Chinese Academy of Sciences

Author

Listed:
  • Xue Yang

    (Sichuan University
    Jincheng College of Sichuan University)

  • Xin Gu

    (Sichuan University
    Sichuan University)

  • Yuandi Wang

    (Sichuan University)

  • Guangyuan Hu

    (Shanghai University of Finance and Economics)

  • Li Tang

    () (Shanghai University of Finance and Economics)

Abstract

Utilizing a unique dataset of the Chinese Academy of Sciences academicians (1993–2013), this paper investigates the Matthew effect in China’s science. Three indicators, namely the concentration index, the Matthew index and the coefficient of variation, are adopted to measure the uneven distribution of academicians of the Chinese Academy of Sciences among different regions and disciplines. The empirical analysis demonstrates the existence of the Matthew effect in China’s science for the above two dimensions. Yet, this effect has weakened for all regions with the exception of Beijing. We argue that this uneven distribution of the nation’s brightest minds makes scientifically competitive regions and disciplines even more competitive while putting those less developed regions and research domains at further disadvantage.

Suggested Citation

  • Xue Yang & Xin Gu & Yuandi Wang & Guangyuan Hu & Li Tang, 2015. "The Matthew effect in China’s science: evidence from academicians of Chinese Academy of Sciences," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 102(3), pages 2089-2105, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:scient:v:102:y:2015:i:3:d:10.1007_s11192-014-1502-5
    DOI: 10.1007/s11192-014-1502-5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

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    2. Wu, Dengsheng & Yuan, Lili & Li, Ruoyun & Li, Jianping, 2018. "Decomposing inequality in research funding by university-institute sub-group: A three-stage nested Theil index," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 1312-1326.

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