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Long live the scientists: Tracking the scientific fame of great minds in physics

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  • Wang, Guoyan
  • Hu, Guangyuan
  • Li, Chuanfeng
  • Tang, Li

Abstract

This study utilizes global digitalized books and articles to examine the scientific fame of the most influential physicists. Our research reveals that the greatest minds are gone but not forgotten. Their scientific impacts on human history have persisted for centuries. We also find evidence in support of own-group fame preference, i.e., that the scientists have greater reputations in their home countries or among scholars sharing the same languages. We argue that, when applied appropriately, Google Books and Ngram Viewer can serve as promising tools for altmetrics, providing a more comprehensive picture of the impacts scholars and their achievements have made beyond academia.

Suggested Citation

  • Wang, Guoyan & Hu, Guangyuan & Li, Chuanfeng & Tang, Li, 2018. "Long live the scientists: Tracking the scientific fame of great minds in physics," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 1089-1098.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:infome:v:12:y:2018:i:4:p:1089-1098
    DOI: 10.1016/j.joi.2018.08.008
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    References listed on IDEAS

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