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Planetary carambolage: The evolutionary political economy of technology, nature and work

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  • Katarzyna Gruszka

    (Vienna University of Economics and Business)

  • Manuel Scholz-Wäckerle

    (Vienna University of Economics and Business)

  • Ernest Aigner

    (Vienna University of Economics and Business)

Abstract

The following editorial introduces the special issue (SI) on “Work, Environment and Planetary-scale Computation in Political-Economic Evolution”. Here, however, we go beyond an outline of what each contribution to the SI addresses, and attempt to draw a more pronounced shared embedding of the arguments that have come to the fore. The original idea of this SI was to synthesize a range of contemporary global political-economic challenges, i.e. (1) technology (esp. digital transformation), (2) nature (esp. ecological crisis) and (3) work (esp. precarization via the evolving platform economy). The main argument developed in this editorial reflection focuses on the common ground and origin of those processes found in the complex evolution of capitalist development. We frame the latter by assigning it a new term, i.e. “planetary carambolage”.

Suggested Citation

  • Katarzyna Gruszka & Manuel Scholz-Wäckerle & Ernest Aigner, 2020. "Planetary carambolage: The evolutionary political economy of technology, nature and work," Review of Evolutionary Political Economy, Springer, vol. 1(3), pages 273-293, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:revepe:v:1:y:2020:i:3:d:10.1007_s43253-020-00030-3
    DOI: 10.1007/s43253-020-00030-3
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