IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/nathaz/v58y2011i2p771-787.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Floods in megacity environments: vulnerability and coping strategies of slum dwellers in Dhaka/Bangladesh

Author

Listed:
  • Boris Braun

    ()

  • Tibor Aßheuer

Abstract

In many megacities of the global south, the combination of rapid population growth and high pressure on space for housing, results in urban growth taking place in areas particularly prone to natural hazards. Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh, is no exception to this rule. Many marginal settlements or slums are located on low-lying land at high risk of flooding. This paper analyzes the vulnerability of slum dwellers in Dhaka and highlights the major factors behind their sensitivity to floods and their ability to adapt to the related changes. The empirical findings presented are based on a questionnaire survey covering 625 households in five slum areas of Dhaka. Our data suggests that social capital plays an important role with regard to the ability of slum dwellers to find ways to live with the floods. Regardless of how strongly people are affected, mutual help and support are dominant features in times of crises. While poorly educated and resourced slum dwellers are highly vulnerable to external shocks, they still show a surprising capacity to cope with natural calamities. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Suggested Citation

  • Boris Braun & Tibor Aßheuer, 2011. "Floods in megacity environments: vulnerability and coping strategies of slum dwellers in Dhaka/Bangladesh," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 58(2), pages 771-787, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:nathaz:v:58:y:2011:i:2:p:771-787
    DOI: 10.1007/s11069-011-9752-5
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11069-011-9752-5
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:ecolec:v:150:y:2018:i:c:p:165-176 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Eoin O’Neill & Michael Brennan & Finbarr Brereton & Harutyun Shahumyan, 2015. "Exploring a spatial statistical approach to quantify flood risk perception using cognitive maps," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 76(3), pages 1573-1601, April.
    3. repec:bla:devpol:v:35:y:2017:i:1:p:65-91 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Pamela McElwee & Tuyen Nghiem & Hue Le & Huong Vu, 2017. "Flood vulnerability among rural households in the Red River Delta of Vietnam: implications for future climate change risk and adaptation," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 86(1), pages 465-492, March.
    5. S. Nazrul Islam & John Winkel, 2017. "Climate Change and Social Inequality," Working Papers 152, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.
    6. repec:spr:nathaz:v:91:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11069-017-3124-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Akiko Masuya & Ashraf Dewan & Robert Corner, 2015. "Population evacuation: evaluating spatial distribution of flood shelters and vulnerable residential units in Dhaka with geographic information systems," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 78(3), pages 1859-1882, September.
    8. Oberlack, Christoph & Eisenack, Klaus, 2012. "Overcoming barriers to urban adaptation through international cooperation? Modes and design properties under the UNFCCC," The Constitutional Economics Network Working Papers 03-2012, University of Freiburg, Department of Economic Policy and Constitutional Economic Theory.
    9. Jelena Kovačević-Majkić & Milena Panić & Dragana Miljanović & Radmila Miletić, 2014. "Vulnerability to natural disasters in Serbia: spatial and temporal comparison," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 72(2), pages 945-968, June.
    10. Andrew Rumbach & Manish Shirgaokar, 2017. "Predictors of household exposure to monsoon rain hazards in informal settlements," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 85(2), pages 709-728, January.
    11. repec:wsi:jeapmx:v:20:y:2018:i:04:n:s1464333218500138 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Flood; Vulnerability; Coping; Adaptation; Slums; Megacities; Dhaka;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:nathaz:v:58:y:2011:i:2:p:771-787. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Springer Nature Abstracting and Indexing). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.