IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

A comparison of U.S and Chinese financial market microstructure: heterogeneous agent-based multi-asset artificial stock markets approach

Listed author(s):
  • Haijun Yang

    ()

  • Harry Wang

    ()

  • Gui Sun

    ()

  • Li Wang

    ()

Registered author(s):

    The market microstructure literatures study how the traders work in the financial market. In this paper, we propose a novel heterogeneous agent-based multi-asset artificial stock market based on Santa Fe Artificial Stock Market (SFI-ASM) to compare the financial market microstructure between U.S. and China. We first develop a set of new parameters for the single stock market simulation to improve the way that agents monitor the market and choose different strategies, which make our model closer to the real financial market. Secondly, we construct a multiple assets financial market by incorporating two new types of agents, namely, zero-intelligence agents and less-intelligence agents, and conduct simulations for different evolution speeds, strategies, and intelligence levels to achieve the optimal models of Chinese and U.S. financial markets before and after the financial crisis. Based on the simulation results, we present a comprehensive analysis of the market microstructure for the two financial markets. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00191-015-0424-6
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Evolutionary Economics.

    Volume (Year): 25 (2015)
    Issue (Month): 5 (November)
    Pages: 901-924

    as
    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:spr:joevec:v:25:y:2015:i:5:p:901-924
    DOI: 10.1007/s00191-015-0424-6
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springer.com

    Order Information: Web: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/191/PS2

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as
    in new window


    1. Norman Ehrentreich, 2002. "The Santa Fe Artificial Stock Market Re-Examined - Suggested Corrections," Computational Economics 0209001, EconWPA.
    2. Tay, Nicholas S. P. & Linn, Scott C., 2001. "Fuzzy inductive reasoning, expectation formation and the behavior of security prices," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 25(3-4), pages 321-361, March.
    3. Grossman, Sanford J & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1980. "On the Impossibility of Informationally Efficient Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 393-408, June.
    4. Alfarano, Simone & Lux, Thomas & Wagner, Friedrich, 2008. "Time variation of higher moments in a financial market with heterogeneous agents: An analytical approach," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 101-136, January.
    5. Bray, Margaret, 1982. "Learning, estimation, and the stability of rational expectations," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 318-339, April.
    6. Ludo Waltman & Nees Eck & Rommert Dekker & Uzay Kaymak, 2011. "Economic modeling using evolutionary algorithms: the effect of a binary encoding of strategies," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 21(5), pages 737-756, December.
    7. Florian Hauser & Bob Kaempff, 2013. "Evolution of trading strategies in a market with heterogeneously informed agents," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 23(3), pages 575-607, July.
    8. LeBaron, Blake & Arthur, W. Brian & Palmer, Richard, 1999. "Time series properties of an artificial stock market," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 23(9-10), pages 1487-1516, September.
    9. Madhavan, Ananth, 2000. "Market microstructure: A survey," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 3(3), pages 205-258, August.
    10. Chen, Shu-Heng & Yeh, Chia-Hsuan, 2001. "Evolving traders and the business school with genetic programming: A new architecture of the agent-based artificial stock market," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 25(3-4), pages 363-393, March.
    11. Hoffmann, Arvid O.I. & Post, Thomas & Pennings, Joost M.E., 2013. "Individual investor perceptions and behavior during the financial crisis," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 60-74.
    12. Lux, Thomas, 1995. "Herd Behaviour, Bubbles and Crashes," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 105(431), pages 881-896, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:joevec:v:25:y:2015:i:5:p:901-924. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla)

    or (Rebekah McClure)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.