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A model of trade between creative regions in the presence of sector specific learning by doing

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  • Amitrajeet Batabyal

    ()

  • Hamid Beladi

    ()

Abstract

We analyze a model of trade between two heterogeneous regions that are creative in the sense of Richard Florida. One region is larger than the other region in terms of its endowment of creative capital. Each region produces a single final good with inputs 1 and 2 that are traded. There is learning by doing only in the sector producing input 1. Our primary objective is to study the impacts of this sector specific learning by doing and trade on the economies of the two regions under consideration. Our analysis leads to two salient results. First, when a specific condition holds, the smaller region specializes completely in the production of input 1 but there is incomplete specialization in the larger region. In particular, at time t=0, not all creative capital in the larger region is employed in sector 2 and there is some learning by doing in this larger region as well. Second, in the long run, the smaller region continues to specialize completely in the production of input 1 but the larger region specializes completely in the production of input 2. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Amitrajeet Batabyal & Hamid Beladi, 2014. "A model of trade between creative regions in the presence of sector specific learning by doing," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 24(3), pages 573-585, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:joevec:v:24:y:2014:i:3:p:573-585
    DOI: 10.1007/s00191-013-0332-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Todd Gabe & Richard Florida & Charlotta Mellander, 2012. "The Creative Class and the crisis," Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, Cambridge Political Economy Society, vol. 6(1), pages 37-53.
    3. Ron A. Boschma & Michael Fritsch, 2009. "Creative Class and Regional Growth: Empirical Evidence from Seven European Countries," Economic Geography, Clark University, vol. 85(4), pages 391-423, October.
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    8. Richard Florida & Charlotta Mellander & Kevin Stolarick, 2008. "Inside the black box of regional development: human capital, the creative class and tolerance," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 8(5), pages 615-649, September.
    9. Emanuela Marrocu & Raffaele Paci, 2012. "Education or Creativity: What Matters Most for Economic Performance?," Economic Geography, Clark University, vol. 88(4), pages 369-401, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Amitrajeet A. BATABYAL & Hamid BELADI, 2016. "Trade Between Creative Regions When The Input Elasticity Of Substitution Is Less Than Unity," Regional Science Inquiry, Hellenic Association of Regional Scientists, vol. 0(3), pages 11-18, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Creative capital; Creative region; Learning by doing; Specialization; Trade; R11; F12;

    JEL classification:

    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • F12 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Models of Trade with Imperfect Competition and Scale Economies; Fragmentation

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