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The Relationship Between Meaning in Life and Subjective Well-Being: Forgiveness and Hope as Mediators

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  • İlhan Yalçın

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  • Asude Malkoç

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether hope and forgiveness are mediators in the relationship between meaning in life and subjective well-being. The sample consisted of 482 university students. The Meaning in Life Questionnaire, the Scale of Positive and Negative Experience, the Satisfaction with Life Scale, the State Hope Scale, the Dispositional Hope Scale, the Heartland Forgiveness Scale, and the demographic information form were used for data collection. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data. Fitness of the hypothesized model was tested through some model specifications. The results of the study indicated that hope and forgiveness fully mediated the relationship between meaning in life and subjective well-being. The findings of the study have contributed to the efforts to understand factors associated with subjective well-being of university students. These findings were discussed in the light of related literature and implications were suggested for university counseling services and future research. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Suggested Citation

  • İlhan Yalçın & Asude Malkoç, 2015. "The Relationship Between Meaning in Life and Subjective Well-Being: Forgiveness and Hope as Mediators," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 16(4), pages 915-929, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jhappi:v:16:y:2015:i:4:p:915-929
    DOI: 10.1007/s10902-014-9540-5
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10902-014-9540-5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Karen Cohen & David Cairns, 2012. "Is Searching for Meaning in Life Associated With Reduced Subjective Well-Being? Confirmation and Possible Moderators," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 313-331, April.
    2. Catherine Ratelle & Karine Simard & Frédéric Guay, 2013. "University Students’ Subjective Well-being: The Role of Autonomy Support from Parents, Friends, and the Romantic Partner," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 893-910, June.
    3. Carlsson, Fredrik & Lampi, Elina & Li, Wanxin & Martinsson, Peter, 2014. "Subjective well-being among preadolescents and their parents – Evidence of intergenerational transmission of well-being from urban China," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 11-18.
    4. Isabel Hombrados-Mendieta & Miguel García-Martín & Luis Gómez-Jacinto, 2013. "The Relationship Between Social Support, Loneliness, and Subjective Well-Being in a Spanish Sample from a Multidimensional Perspective," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 114(3), pages 1013-1034, December.
    5. Ed Diener & Derrick Wirtz & William Tov & Chu Kim-Prieto & Dong-won Choi & Shigehiro Oishi & Robert Biswas-Diener, 2010. "New Well-being Measures: Short Scales to Assess Flourishing and Positive and Negative Feelings," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 97(2), pages 143-156, June.
    6. Jingjing Zhao & Feng Kong & Yonghui Wang, 2013. "Shyness and Subjective Well-being: The Role of Emotional Intelligence and Social Support," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 114(3), pages 891-900, December.
    7. Peter Meer, 2014. "Gender, Unemployment and Subjective Well-Being: Why Being Unemployed Is Worse for Men than for Women," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 115(1), pages 23-44, January.
    8. Gülşah Kemer & Gökhan Atik, 2012. "Hope and Social Support in High School Students from Urban and Rural Areas of Ankara, Turkey," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 13(5), pages 901-911, October.
    9. Anat Shoshani & Michelle Slone, 2013. "Middle School Transition from the Strengths Perspective: Young Adolescents’ Character Strengths, Subjective Well-Being, and School Adjustment," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 14(4), pages 1163-1181, August.
    10. Judith Gere & Ulrich Schimmack, 2013. "When Romantic Partners’ Goals Conflict: Effects on Relationship Quality and Subjective Well-Being," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 14(1), pages 37-49, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Neal Krause & Kenneth I. Pargament, 2017. "Losing My Religion: Exploring the Relationship Between a Decline in Faith and a Positive Affect," Applied Research in Quality of Life, Springer;International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies, vol. 12(4), pages 885-901, December.
    2. Mine Muyan-Yılık & Ayhan Demir, 2020. "A Pathway Towards Subjective Well-Being for Turkish University Students: The Roles of Dispositional Hope, Cognitive Flexibility, and Coping Strategies," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 21(6), pages 1945-1963, August.
    3. Miao Miao & Lei Zheng & Yiqun Gan, 2017. "Meaning in Life Promotes Proactive Coping via Positive Affect: A Daily Diary Study," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 18(6), pages 1683-1696, December.
    4. Wuke Zhang & Mingliang Chen & Ying Xie & Zhen Zhao, 2018. "Prosocial Spending and Subjective Well-Being: The Recipient Perspective," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 19(8), pages 2267-2281, December.

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