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The demand for relational goods: empirical evidence from the European Social Survey

  • Björn Bünger

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s12232-010-0094-5
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    Article provided by Springer in its journal International Review of Economics.

    Volume (Year): 57 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 2 (June)
    Pages: 177-198

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:inrvec:v:57:y:2010:i:2:p:177-198
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/12232

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

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    1. Corneo, Giacomo, 2002. "Work and Television," CEPR Discussion Papers 3373, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Leonardo Becchetti & Marika Santoro, 2007. "The Income–Unhappiness Paradox: A Relational Goods/Baumol Disease Explanation," Chapters, in: Handbook on the Economics of Happiness, chapter 13 Edward Elgar.
    3. Bruno S. Frey & Christine Benesch & Alois Stutzer, 2005. "Does Watching TV Make Us Happy?," CREMA Working Paper Series 2005-15, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    4. Luigino Bruni & Luca Stanca, 2005. "Watching alone: Relational Goods, Television and Happiness," Working Papers 90, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Jun 2005.
    5. Stefano Bartolini & Ennio Bilancini & Maurizio Pugno, 2008. "Did the Decline in Social Capital Depress Americans’ Happiness?," Department of Economics University of Siena 540, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
    6. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521801669 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Luigino Bruni & Luca Stanca, 2005. "Income Aspirations, Television and Happiness: Evidence from the World Value Surveys," Working Papers 89, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Jun 2005.
    8. Mark Aguiar & Erik Hurst, 2006. "Measuring trends in leisure," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
    9. Leonardo Becchetti & Elena Giachin Ricca & Alessandra Pelloni, 2009. "The 60s Turnaround as a Test on the Causal Relationship between Sociability and Happiness," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 209, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    10. Sarracino, Francesco, 2010. "Social capital and subjective well-being trends: Comparing 11 western European countries," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 39(4), pages 482-517, August.
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