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An assessment of the Francois-Xavier Bagnoud poverty alleviation program in Rwanda and Uganda

Author

Listed:
  • Michael O. Harhay

    () (University of Pennsylvania
    University of Pennsylvania)

  • Mary C. Smith Fawzi

    () (Harvard Medical School)

  • Sacha Jeanneret

    () (Franҫois-Xavier Bagnoud International)

  • Damascène Ndayisaba

    () (Franҫois-Xavier Bagnoud International)

  • William Kibaalya

    () (Franҫois-Xavier Bagnoud International)

  • Emily A. Harrison

    () (Harvard University)

  • Dylan S. Small

    () (University of Pennsylvania)

Abstract

Abstract Objectives We evaluate the three-year community-based FXBVillage poverty-alleviation model, which provides extremely poor families with sustained social support and graduated material support for education, healthcare, housing, nutrition, and income-generation. Methods We combine a pre/post analysis of participant households in Rwanda (n = 912) and Uganda (n = 628) with construction and assessment of a combined multivariable household wealth index comparing FXBVillage data with national Demographic Health Surveys. Results Many FXBVillage households shifted to higher household wealth quintiles. This shift was particularly strong in Rwanda. Increases among relevant household characteristics included (in Rwanda/Uganda): ≥3 meals/day (5–88%)/(44–86%), school attendance 5–17 years (79–97%)/(64–89%), adequate school supplies (7–97%)/(4–71%), and communal financial support if needed (27–98%)/(29–87%). Universal bednet ownership and water treatment was nearly attained; vaccine coverage was not, especially in Uganda. Conclusions The model likely supports poverty-alleviation among participants. The variability of improvements, across indicators and countries, highlights the need for better understanding of interactions within programs and between programs and implementation settings, as well as how these interactions matter to poverty-reduction strategies.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael O. Harhay & Mary C. Smith Fawzi & Sacha Jeanneret & Damascène Ndayisaba & William Kibaalya & Emily A. Harrison & Dylan S. Small, 2017. "An assessment of the Francois-Xavier Bagnoud poverty alleviation program in Rwanda and Uganda," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 62(2), pages 241-252, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:ijphth:v:62:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s00038-016-0907-8
    DOI: 10.1007/s00038-016-0907-8
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Owen O'Donnell & Eddy van Doorslaer & Adam Wagstaff & Magnus Lindelow, 2008. "Analyzing Health Equity Using Household Survey Data : A Guide to Techniques and Their Implementation," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6896, December.
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    3. Abhijit V. Banerjee & Esther Duflo, 2007. "The Economic Lives of the Poor," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 21(1), pages 141-168, Winter.
    4. van Rooyen, C. & Stewart, R. & de Wet, T., 2012. "The Impact of Microfinance in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Systematic Review of the Evidence," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(11), pages 2249-2262.
    5. Young-Chul Kim & Glenn Loury, 2014. "Social externalities, overlap and the poverty trap," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 12(4), pages 535-554, December.
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