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The world’s economic geography: evidence from the world input–output table

Author

Listed:
  • Elvio Mattioli

    () (Università Politecnica delle Marche)

  • Giuseppe Ricciardo Lamonica

    () (Università Politecnica delle Marche)

Abstract

The principal aim of this paper was to analyse the world’s economic structure, the degree of interaction between the economic systems of countries, and its temporal evolution. The analysis is carried out on the basis of the world input–output table for the period between 1995 and 2011 and using a functional approach able to detect the intensity of the direct and indirect links among the countries considered. The purpose was therefore to identify, on the one hand, the most important economic systems and, on the other hand, those attracted by the former. The main results obtained show a high degree of globalization of local economic systems and the growing role of the German economy in Europe and the Chinese economy in Asia.

Suggested Citation

  • Elvio Mattioli & Giuseppe Ricciardo Lamonica, 2016. "The world’s economic geography: evidence from the world input–output table," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 50(3), pages 697-728, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:empeco:v:50:y:2016:i:3:d:10.1007_s00181-015-0962-7
    DOI: 10.1007/s00181-015-0962-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Michael Lahr & Louis de Mesnard, 2004. "Biproportional Techniques in Input-Output Analysis: Table Updating and Structural Analysis," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(2), pages 115-134.
    2. Frank Corvers & Maud Hensen & Dion Bongaerts, 2009. "Delimitation and Coherence of Functional and Administrative Regions," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(1), pages 19-31.
    3. Arnold Tukker & Erik Dietzenbacher, 2013. "Global Multiregional Input-Output Frameworks: An Introduction And Outlook," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(1), pages 1-19, March.
    4. Leontief, Wassily, 1974. "Structure of the World Economy: Outline of a Simple Input-Output Formulation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 64(6), pages 823-834, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    World’s economic structure; Input–output analysis; Markov finite chain; Mean time; First passage;

    JEL classification:

    • C38 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Classification Methdos; Cluster Analysis; Principal Components; Factor Analysis
    • C67 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Input-Output Models
    • D57 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Input-Output Tables and Analysis
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration

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