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The Effects of Childhood, Adult, and Community Socioeconomic Conditions on Health and Mortality among Older Adults in China

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  • Ming Wen

    ()

  • Danan Gu

    ()

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Ming Wen & Danan Gu, 2011. "The Effects of Childhood, Adult, and Community Socioeconomic Conditions on Health and Mortality among Older Adults in China," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(1), pages 153-181, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:48:y:2011:i:1:p:153-181
    DOI: 10.1007/s13524-010-0003-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mark Hayward & Bridget Gorman, 2004. "The long arm of childhood: The influence of early-life social conditions on men’s mortality," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 41(1), pages 87-107, February.
    2. Angus Deaton, 2003. "Health, Inequality, and Economic Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 41(1), pages 113-158, March.
    3. Zhenmei Zhang & Danan Gu & Mark D. Hayward, 2008. "Early Life Influences on Cognitive Impairment Among Oldest Old Chinese," Journals of Gerontology: Series B, Gerontological Society of America, vol. 63(1), pages 25-33.
    4. Veenstra, Gerry, 2000. "Social capital, SES and health: an individual-level analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 50(5), pages 619-629, March.
    5. Zeng Yi & Danan Gu & Kenneth Land, 2007. "The association of childhood socioeconomic conditions with healthy longevity at the oldest-old ages in China," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 44(3), pages 497-518, August.
    6. Danan Gu & Yi Zeng, 2004. "Sociodemographic Effects on the Onset and Recovery of ADL Disability among Chinese Oldest-old," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 11(1), pages 1-42, August.
    7. S. V. Subramanian & Laura Kubzansky & Lisa Berkman & Martha Fay & Ichiro Kawachi, 2006. "Neighborhood Effects on the Self-Rated Health of Elders: Uncovering the Relative Importance of Structural and Service-Related Neighborhood Environments," Journals of Gerontology: Series B, Gerontological Society of America, vol. 61(3), pages 153-160.
    8. Jersey Liang & John F. McCarthy & Arvind Jain & Neal Krause & Joan M. Bennett & Shengzu Gu, 2000. "Socioeconomic Gradient in Old Age Mortality in Wuhan, China," Journals of Gerontology: Series B, Gerontological Society of America, vol. 55(4), pages 222-233.
    9. Hart, Carole L. & Davey Smith, George & Blane, David, 1998. "Social mobility and 21Â year mortality in a cohort of Scottish men," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 47(8), pages 1121-1130, October.
    10. Matthew Dupre & Alexis Franzese & Emilio Parrado, 2006. "Religious attendance and mortality: Implications for the black-white mortality crossover," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 43(1), pages 141-164, February.
    11. Gavin Turrell & John W. Lynch & George A. Kaplan & Susan A. Everson & Eeva-Liisa Helkala & Jussi Kauhanen & Jukka T. Salonen, 2002. "Socioeconomic Position Across the Lifecourse and Cognitive Function in Late Middle Age," Journals of Gerontology: Series B, Gerontological Society of America, vol. 57(1), pages 43-51.
    12. Zachary Zimmer & Toshiko Kaneda & Laura Spess, 2007. "An Examination of Urban Versus Rural Mortality in China Using Community and Individual Data," Journals of Gerontology: Series B, Gerontological Society of America, vol. 62(5), pages 349-357.
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    Cited by:

    1. Keera Allendorf, 2013. "Going Nuclear? Family Structure and Young Women’s Health in India, 1992–2006," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(3), pages 853-880, June.
    2. Brandt, Martina & Deindl, Christian & Hank, Karsten, 2012. "Tracing the origins of successful aging: The role of childhood conditions and social inequality in explaining later life health," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(9), pages 1418-1425.
    3. Liu, Guangya & Dupre, Matthew E. & Gu, Danan & Mair, Christine A. & Chen, Feinian, 2012. "Psychological well-being of the institutionalized and community-residing oldest old in China: The role of children," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(10), pages 1874-1882.
    4. Linda G. Martin & Qiushi Feng & Robert F. Schoeni & Yi Zeng, 2014. "Trends in Functional and Activity Limitations among Chinese Oldest-Old, 1998 to 2008," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 40(3), pages 475-495, September.

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