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Early life exposures and the occurrence and timing of heart disease among the older adult Puerto Rican population

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  • Mary Mceniry
  • Alberto Palloni

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  • Mary Mceniry & Alberto Palloni, 2010. "Early life exposures and the occurrence and timing of heart disease among the older adult Puerto Rican population," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 47(1), pages 23-43, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:47:y:2010:i:1:p:23-43
    DOI: 10.1353/dem.0.0093
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Michael Baker & Mark Stabile & Catherine Deri, 2004. "What Do Self-Reported, Objective, Measures of Health Measure?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(4).
    2. Mary McEniry & Alberto Palloni & Ana Luisa Dávila & Alberto García Gurucharri, 2008. "Early Life Exposure to Poor Nutrition and Infectious Diseases and Its Effects on the Health of Older Puerto Rican Adults," Journals of Gerontology: Series B, Gerontological Society of America, vol. 63(6), pages 337-348.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Janet Currie & Tom Vogl, 2013. "Early-Life Health and Adult Circumstance in Developing Countries," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 5(1), pages 1-36, May.
    2. Garrett T. Senney & Richard H. Steckel, 2021. "Developmental Origins of Cardiovascular Disease: Understanding High Mortality Rates in the American South," IJERPH, MDPI, vol. 18(24), pages 1-14, December.
    3. Jo Mhairi Hale, 2017. "Cognitive Disparities: The Impact of the Great Depression and Cumulative Inequality on Later-Life Cognitive Function," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 54(6), pages 2125-2158, December.
    4. Lin, Ming-Jen & Liu, Elaine M., 2014. "Does in utero exposure to Illness matter? The 1918 influenza epidemic in Taiwan as a natural experiment," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 152-163.
    5. McGovern, Mark E., 2014. "Comparing the relationship between stature and later life health in six low and middle income countries," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 4(C), pages 128-148.
    6. Brainerd, Elizabeth & Menon, Nidhiya, 2014. "Seasonal effects of water quality: The hidden costs of the Green Revolution to infant and child health in India," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 49-64.
    7. repec:pri:rpdevs:currie_vogl_ar is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Richard H. Steckel & Garrett Senney, 2015. "Historical Origins of a Major Killer: Cardiovascular Disease in the American South," NBER Working Papers 21809, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Lin, Ming-Jen & Liu, Elaine M., 2014. "Does in utero exposure to Illness matter? The 1918 influenza epidemic in Taiwan as a natural experiment," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 152-163.
    10. Mark E. McGovern, 2019. "How much does birth weight matter for child health in developing countries? Estimates from siblings and twins," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(1), pages 3-22, January.
    11. Cabrera-Hernandez, Francisco & Orraca-Romano, Pedro, 2021. "Inequality in the household: neonatal health effects on education outcomes and parents’ compensations among siblings," MPRA Paper 111076, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Richard H. Steckel & Garrett T. Senney, 2015. "Developmental Origins of Cardiovascular Disease: Understanding High Mortality Rates in the American South," Working Papers 15-01, Ohio State University, Department of Economics.
    13. Morton, Patricia M. & Mustillo, Sarah A. & Ferraro, Kenneth F., 2014. "Does childhood misfortune raise the risk of acute myocardial infarction in adulthood?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 133-141.
    14. Marie Baguet & Christelle Dumas, 2019. "How does birth weight affect health and human capital? A short‐ and long‐term evaluation," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(5), pages 597-617, May.
    15. Lena Karlsson, 2017. "Indigenous Infant Mortality by Age and Season of Birth, 1800–1899: Did Season of Birth Affect Children’s Chances for Survival?," IJERPH, MDPI, vol. 15(1), pages 1-12, December.
    16. McEniry, Mary, 2011. "Infant mortality, season of birth and the health of older Puerto Rican adults," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 72(6), pages 1004-1015, March.
    17. Fernando Riosmena & Rebeca Wong & Alberto Palloni, 2013. "Migration Selection, Protection, and Acculturation in Health: A Binational Perspective on Older Adults," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(3), pages 1039-1064, June.
    18. Nobles, Jenna & Hamoudi, Amar, 2019. "Detecting the Effects of Early-Life Exposures: Why Fecundity Matters," SocArXiv x4zm6, Center for Open Science.
    19. Jenna Nobles & Amar Hamoudi, 2019. "Detecting the Effects of Early-Life Exposures: Why Fecundity Matters," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 38(6), pages 783-809, December.

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