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Fifteen years later: Can residential mobility programs provide a long-term escape from neighborhood segregation, crime, and poverty

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  • Micere Keels

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  • Greg Duncan
  • Stefanie Deluca
  • Ruby Mendenhall
  • James Rosenbaum

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Suggested Citation

  • Micere Keels & Greg Duncan & Stefanie Deluca & Ruby Mendenhall & James Rosenbaum, 2005. "Fifteen years later: Can residential mobility programs provide a long-term escape from neighborhood segregation, crime, and poverty," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 42(1), pages 51-73, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:42:y:2005:i:1:p:51-73 DOI: 10.1353/dem.2005.0005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kan, Kamhon, 1999. "Expected and Unexpected Residential Mobility," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 72-96, January.
    2. Susan J. Popkin & James E. Rosenbaum & Patricia M. Meaden, 1993. "Labor market experiences of low-income black women in middle-class suburbs: Evidence from a survey of gautreaux program participants," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(3), pages 556-573.
    3. Edward Gramlich & Deborah Laren & Naomi Sealand, 1992. "Moving into and out of poor urban areas," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(2), pages 273-287.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jacob Vigdor & Jens Ludwig, 2007. "Segregation and the Black-White Test Score Gap," NBER Working Papers 12988, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Dionissi Aliprantis, 2011. "Assessing the evidence on neighborhood effects from moving to opportunity," Working Paper 1101, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    3. Florent Dubois & Christophe Muller, 2017. "Decomposing Well-being Measures in South Africa: The Contribution of Residential Segregation to Income Distribution," AMSE Working Papers 1719, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, Marseille, France.
    4. Florent Dubois, 2017. "The Sources of Segregation," Working Papers halshs-01524506, HAL.
    5. Grodner, Andrew & Kniesner, Thomas J. & Bishop, John A., 2011. "Social Interactions in the Labor Market," Foundations and Trends(R) in Microeconomics, now publishers, vol. 6(4), pages 265-366, September.
    6. Belot, M & Francesconi, M, 2006. "Can Anyone be "The" One? Evidence on Mate Selection from Speed Dating," Economics Discussion Papers 2594, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
    7. Votruba, Mark Edward & Kling, Jeffrey R., 2009. "Effects of neighborhood characteristics on the mortality of black male youth: Evidence from Gautreaux, Chicago," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 68(5), pages 814-823, March.
    8. Dionissi Aliprantis, 2017. "Assessing the evidence on neighborhood effects from Moving to Opportunity," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 52(3), pages 925-954, May.
    9. Anna Christina D'Addio, 2007. "Intergenerational Transmission of Disadvantage: Mobility or Immobility Across Generations?," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 52, OECD Publishing.

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