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Implicit Finance in Gambling Expenditures: Australian Evidence on Socioeconomic and Demographic Tax Incidence

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  • Andrew C. Worthington

    (Queensland University of Technology, a.worthington@qut.edu.au)

Abstract

This article examines two issues. First, it evaluates the statistical significance of a number of socioeconomic and demographic variables on the level of gambling-type expenditures in New South Wales, Australia. Factors analyzed include household income, family composition, welfare status, gender, age, occupation, and ethnicity. Second, the study examines the incidence of gambling-type expenditures, and hence taxation, on New South Wales’ households. The study confirms similar findings overseas on the income regressivity of gambling expenditures. All other things being equal, Lotto and Instant Lotto are the most regressive of the major gambling products in their incidence on Australian households, and they are certainly more regressive than comparable North American instruments.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew C. Worthington, 2001. "Implicit Finance in Gambling Expenditures: Australian Evidence on Socioeconomic and Demographic Tax Incidence," Public Finance Review, , vol. 29(4), pages 326-342, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:pubfin:v:29:y:2001:i:4:p:326-342
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    1. repec:kap:reveho:v:15:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s11150-015-9306-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Andrew C. Worthington & Kerry Brown & Mary Crawford & David Pickernell, 2003. "Socioeconomic And Demographic Determinants Of Household Gambling In Australia," School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series 156, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
    3. Humphreys, Brad & Perez, Levi, 2011. "Lottery Participants and Revenues: An International Survey of Economic Research on Lotteries," Working Papers 2011-17, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.
    4. Tim Friehe & Mario Mechtel, 2017. "Gambling to leapfrog in status?," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 1291-1319, December.
    5. Melissa S. Kearney, 2005. "The Economic Winners and Losers of Legalized Gambling," NBER Working Papers 11234, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Kearney, Melissa Schettini, 2005. "State lotteries and consumer behavior," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(11-12), pages 2269-2299, December.
    7. Humphreys, Brad R. & Soebbing, Brian, 2012. "Sports betting, sports bettors and sports gambling policy," Edition HWWI: Chapters,in: Sport und Sportgroßveranstaltungen in Europa - zwischen Zentralstaat und Regionen, pages 15-37 Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
    8. Humphreys, Brad R. & Perez, Levi, 2012. "Who Bets on Sports? Characteristics of Sports Bettors and the Consequences of Expanding Sports Betting Opportunities/¿Quién apuesta? Características de los apostantes deportivos y consecuencias de la ," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 30, pages 579-598, Agosto.
    9. Brad Humphreys & Levi Perez, 2012. "Network externalities in consumer spending on lottery games: evidence from Spain," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 42(3), pages 929-945, June.
    10. Dimitri Kohler, 2016. "On the Regressivity of Gambling Taxes in Switzerland," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 152(III), pages 193-208, September.
    11. Humphreys, Brad R. & Perez, Levi, 2013. "Syndicated play in lottery games," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 124-131.

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