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Arab-Israeli Defense Spending and Economic Growth

Author

Listed:
  • Karl R. DeRouen Jr.

    (Economists Allied for Arms Reduction-Israel)

Abstract

Research on the nexus between defense spending and economic growth in the Third World has generated discrepant findings. This debate takes on added relevance in the wake of recent substantive moves toward peace in the Middle East. This study considers the relationship between defense spending and economic growth over time in the Middle East. It also addresses the externality effects defense spending has on the economies. Contextual factors such as aims production and regime type of Egypt, Israel, Jordan and Syria are put forth as possible explanations of the disparate findings to date. The findings suggest that the potential for peace dividends in Egypt and Syria is contingent upon increases in allocations to non-defense government spending. For Israel defense cuts alone may actually hinder growth in the short run. In Jordan, the defense sector is shown to be surprisingly productive and therefore any potential peace dividend must rely upon cooperative regional ventures, and not defense cuts.

Suggested Citation

  • Karl R. DeRouen Jr., 1995. "Arab-Israeli Defense Spending and Economic Growth," Conflict Management and Peace Science, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 14(1), pages 25-47, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:compsc:v:14:y:1995:i:1:p:25-47
    DOI: 10.1177/073889429501400102
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Biswas, Basudeb & Ram, Rati, 1986. "Military Expenditures and Economic Growth in Less Developed Countries: An Augmented Model and Further Evidence," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 34(2), pages 361-372, January.
    2. McGuire, Martin C, 1987. "Foreign Assistance, Investment, and Defense: A Methodological Study with an Application to Israel, 1960-1979," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 35(4), pages 847-873, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Aamer Abu-Qarn, 2010. "The Defense-Growth Nexus: An Application for the Israeli-Arab Conflict," Working Papers 1003, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Economics.
    2. Po‐Sheng Lin & Cheng‐Te Lee, 2012. "Military Spending, Threats And Stochastic Growth," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(1), pages 8-19, January.
    3. Abu-Bader, Suleiman & Abu-Qarn, Aamer S., 2003. "Government expenditures, military spending and economic growth: causality evidence from Egypt, Israel, and Syria," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 25(6-7), pages 567-583, September.
    4. Aamer Abu-qarn, 2010. "The Defence-Growth Nexus Revisited: Evidence From The Israeli-Arab Conflict," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(4), pages 291-300.
    5. Aamer S. Abu-Qarn, 2008. "Six decades of the Israeli-Arab conflict: An assessment of the economic aspects," Economics of Peace and Security Journal, EPS Publishing, vol. 3(2), pages 8-15, July.
    6. Henryk Gurgul & Łukasz Lach & Roland Mestel, 2012. "The relationship between budgetary expenditure and economic growth in Poland," Central European Journal of Operations Research, Springer;Slovak Society for Operations Research;Hungarian Operational Research Society;Czech Society for Operations Research;Österr. Gesellschaft für Operations Research (ÖGOR);Slovenian Society Informatika - Section for Operational Research;Croatian Operational Research Society, vol. 20(1), pages 161-182, March.
    7. Lin Hung-Pin & Tsung-Li Wang & Cheng-Lang Yang, 2016. "Further Causality Evidence on Arms Race, Inflation and Economic Growth," ECONOMIC COMPUTATION AND ECONOMIC CYBERNETICS STUDIES AND RESEARCH, Faculty of Economic Cybernetics, Statistics and Informatics, vol. 50(2), pages 123-136.
    8. Cheng-te Lee & Shang-fen Wu, 2015. "Military Spending and Stochastic Growth: A Small Open Economy," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(4), pages 2026-2036.

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