IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/sae/compsc/v14y1995i1p25-47.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Arab-Israeli Defense Spending and Economic Growth

Author

Listed:
  • Karl R. DeRouen Jr.

    (Economists Allied for Arms Reduction-Israel)

Abstract

Research on the nexus between defense spending and economic growth in the Third World has generated discrepant findings. This debate takes on added relevance in the wake of recent substantive moves toward peace in the Middle East. This study considers the relationship between defense spending and economic growth over time in the Middle East. It also addresses the externality effects defense spending has on the economies. Contextual factors such as aims production and regime type of Egypt, Israel, Jordan and Syria are put forth as possible explanations of the disparate findings to date. The findings suggest that the potential for peace dividends in Egypt and Syria is contingent upon increases in allocations to non-defense government spending. For Israel defense cuts alone may actually hinder growth in the short run. In Jordan, the defense sector is shown to be surprisingly productive and therefore any potential peace dividend must rely upon cooperative regional ventures, and not defense cuts.

Suggested Citation

  • Karl R. DeRouen Jr., 1995. "Arab-Israeli Defense Spending and Economic Growth," Conflict Management and Peace Science, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 14(1), pages 25-47, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:compsc:v:14:y:1995:i:1:p:25-47
    DOI: 10.1177/073889429501400102
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/073889429501400102
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1177/073889429501400102?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Aamer Abu-Qarn, 2010. "The Defense-Growth Nexus: An Application for the Israeli-Arab Conflict," Working Papers 1003, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Economics.
    2. Po‐Sheng Lin & Cheng‐Te Lee, 2012. "Military Spending, Threats And Stochastic Growth," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(1), pages 8-19, January.
    3. Abu-Bader, Suleiman & Abu-Qarn, Aamer S., 2003. "Government expenditures, military spending and economic growth: causality evidence from Egypt, Israel, and Syria," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 25(6-7), pages 567-583, September.
    4. Aamer Abu-qarn, 2010. "The Defence-Growth Nexus Revisited: Evidence From The Israeli-Arab Conflict," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(4), pages 291-300.
    5. Aamer S. Abu-Qarn, 2008. "Six decades of the Israeli-Arab conflict: An assessment of the economic aspects," Economics of Peace and Security Journal, EPS Publishing, vol. 3(2), pages 8-15, July.
    6. Henryk Gurgul & Łukasz Lach & Roland Mestel, 2012. "The relationship between budgetary expenditure and economic growth in Poland," Central European Journal of Operations Research, Springer;Slovak Society for Operations Research;Hungarian Operational Research Society;Czech Society for Operations Research;Österr. Gesellschaft für Operations Research (ÖGOR);Slovenian Society Informatika - Section for Operational Research;Croatian Operational Research Society, vol. 20(1), pages 161-182, March.
    7. Lin Hung-Pin & Tsung-Li Wang & Cheng-Lang Yang, 2016. "Further Causality Evidence on Arms Race, Inflation and Economic Growth," ECONOMIC COMPUTATION AND ECONOMIC CYBERNETICS STUDIES AND RESEARCH, Faculty of Economic Cybernetics, Statistics and Informatics, vol. 50(2), pages 123-136.
    8. Cheng-te Lee & Shang-fen Wu, 2015. "Military Spending and Stochastic Growth: A Small Open Economy," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(4), pages 2026-2036.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sae:compsc:v:14:y:1995:i:1:p:25-47. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://pss.la.psu.edu/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no bibliographic references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: SAGE Publications (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://pss.la.psu.edu/ .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.