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The Defence-Growth Nexus Revisited: Evidence From The Israeli-Arab Conflict

Listed author(s):
  • Aamer Abu-qarn

This paper revisits the defence-growth nexus for the rivals of the Israeli-Arab conflict over the last four decades. To this end, we utilize the Toda and Yamamoto (1995) causality test and the generalized variance decomposition. Contrary to the conventional wisdom and many earlier studies, we fail to detect any persistent adverse impact of military expenditures on economic growth. Our conclusions are kept intact even when we account for the possibility of endogenous structural breaks and during the post-1979 peace treaty period. Our findings imply insignificant peace dividends once the conflict is resolved and the military spending is cut to internationally acceptable standards.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10242694.2010.491699
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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Defence and Peace Economics.

Volume (Year): 21 (2010)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 291-300

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Handle: RePEc:taf:defpea:v:21:y:2010:i:4:p:291-300
DOI: 10.1080/10242694.2010.491699
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