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Dimensions of Public Policy and Governance

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  • John N.N Ugoani

Abstract

In a strong sense, a country is a close reflection of its public policy which is the main driver of its governance architecture. The present study was therefore designed to explore the possible relationship between public policy and governance. Obviously, diagnosing the quality of governance through the ingredients of public policy arrangements is crucial to determining practical and sustainable strategies for approaching good governance. Governance which is frequently left in the hands of the political and administrative leadership through the instrumentality of public policy refers broadly to the exercise of power through a nation’s economic, cultural, social, and political institutions for the benefit of the vast majority of the citizens. Any failure to exercise such power in the proper ways leads to exclusion, poverty, frustration, aggression, and insecurity. For many years, the performance record of Nigerian public bureaucracy is a catalogue of failed public policy and reforms. The seemingly inability of government bureaucracy to deliver much needed services to the vast majority of the citizens and the resultant decline of the standard of living of the people may be held as a conclusive evidence of failed public policy and reforms. The emergence of Nigeria as one of the poorest countries in the world cannot but be attributed to dismal public policy. The survey research design was adopted for the study and data generated were analyzed through tables, frequencies, percentages and the Chi-Square statistical technique. The study found strong positive relationship between public policy and governance.

Suggested Citation

  • John N.N Ugoani, 2014. "Dimensions of Public Policy and Governance," Journal of Public Policy & Governance, Research Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 1(2), pages 82-92.
  • Handle: RePEc:rss:jnljpg:v1i2p4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Francois Bourguignon, 2004. "The Poverty-growth-inequality triangle," Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations, New Delhi Working Papers 125, Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations, New Delhi, India.
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