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Marital wage gap

Author

Listed:
  • Aistov, Andrey

    () (National Research University Higher School of Economics (Nizhnii Novgorod) Russia)

Abstract

In the paper relationship of men’s income and their marital status is tested empirically. The Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey of HSE (RLMS HSE) data (1994–2011) confirm that men who are officially or civil married and were married before earn more in average than men who are not and were not married. This is explained by hypotheses of selection and treatment. The hypotheses are tested by the Mincerian type equations estimates. The using data do not reject the hypotheses.

Suggested Citation

  • Aistov, Andrey, 2013. "Marital wage gap," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 99-114.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:apltrx:0218
    as

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    File URL: http://pe.cemi.rssi.ru/pe_2013_3_99-114.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Becker, Gary S, 1973. "A Theory of Marriage: Part I," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(4), pages 813-846, July-Aug..
    2. Christopher Dougherty, 2006. "The Marriage Earnings Premium as a Distributed Fixed Effect," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 41(2).
    3. Elena Bardasi & Mark Taylor, 2008. "Marriage and Wages: A Test of the Specialization Hypothesis," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 75(299), pages 569-591, August.
    4. Harry A. Krashinsky, 2004. "Do Marital Status and Computer Usage Really Change the Wage Structure?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(3).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    marital status; marital wage gap; mens income; selection; treatment; RLMS HSE; panel data; distributed fixed effect;

    JEL classification:

    • C01 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - General - - - Econometrics
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • D01 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Behavior: Underlying Principles
    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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