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Anatomy of a Credit Crunch: From Capital to Labor Markets

Author

Listed:
  • Francisco Buera

    (UCLA)

  • Roberto Fattal-Jaef

    (World Bank)

  • Yongseok Shin

    (Washington University on St. Louis)

Abstract

Why are financial crises associated with a sustained rise in unemployment? We develop a tractable model with frictions in both credit and labor markets to study the aggregate andmicro-level implications of a credit crunch---i.e., a sudden tightening of collateral constraints. When we simulate a credit crunch calibrated to match the observed decline in the ratio of debt to non-financial assets of the United States business sector following the 2007-8 crisis, our model generates a sharp decline in output---explained by a drop in aggregate total factor productivity and investment---and a protracted increase in unemployment. We then explore the micro-level impact by tracking the employment dynamics for firms of different sizes and ages. The credit crunch causes a much larger reduction in the net employment growth rate of small, young establishments relative to that of large, old producers, consistent with the recent empirical findings in the literature. (Copyright: Elsevier)

Suggested Citation

  • Francisco Buera & Roberto Fattal-Jaef & Yongseok Shin, 2015. "Anatomy of a Credit Crunch: From Capital to Labor Markets," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 18(1), pages 101-117, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:issued:14-63
    DOI: 10.1016/j.red.2014.11.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial frictions; Unemployment;

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • L25 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Firm Performance

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