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An application of business cycle accounting with misspecified wedges


  • Masaru Inaba

    (Kansai University)

  • Kengo Nutahara

    (Senshu University)


It is often assumed that wedges evolve according to VAR(1) in the applications of business cycle accounting (BCA). However, recent research finds that the wedges have no VAR(1) representation in many dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) economies, and that there might be a misspecification of the stochastic process of wedges. In order to assess the empirical usefulness of BCA, we apply BCA to a widely used medium-scale DSGE economy. Based on our experiments, we find that the accuracy of the measurement of wedges is high enough to capture the business cycle implications of wedges. (Copyright: Elsevier)

Suggested Citation

  • Masaru Inaba & Kengo Nutahara, 2012. "An application of business cycle accounting with misspecified wedges," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 15(2), pages 265-269, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:issued:08-173
    DOI: 10.1016/

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Erasmus Kersting, 2008. "The 1980s Recession in the UK: A Business Cycle Accounting Perspective," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 11(1), pages 179-191, January.
    2. Otsu Keisuke, 2010. "A Neoclassical Analysis of the Asian Crisis: Business Cycle Accounting for a Small Open Economy," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-39, July.
    3. V. V. Chari & Patrick J. Kehoe & Ellen R. McGrattan, 2007. "Business Cycle Accounting," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 75(3), pages 781-836, May.
    4. Frank Smets & Rafael Wouters, 2007. "Shocks and Frictions in US Business Cycles: A Bayesian DSGE Approach," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(3), pages 586-606, June.
    5. Kobayashi, Keiichiro & Inaba, Masaru, 2006. "Business cycle accounting for the Japanese economy," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 418-440, December.
    6. V. V. Chari & Patrick J. Kehoe & Ellen R. McGrattan, 2003. "Accounting for the Great Depression," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Spr, pages 2-8.
    7. Gregor Baeurle & Daniel Burren, 2007. "A Note on Business Cycle Accounting," Diskussionsschriften dp0705, Universitaet Bern, Departement Volkswirtschaft.
    8. NUTAHARA Kengo & INABA Masaru, 2008. "On Equivalence Results in Business Cycle Accounting," Discussion papers 08015, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
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    Cited by:

    1. Keisuke Otsu, 2012. "How well can business cycle accounting account for business cycles?," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 32(2), pages 1774-1784.
    2. Jacek Rothert & Mohammad Rahmati, 2014. "Business Cycle Accounting in a Small Open Economy," Departmental Working Papers 46, United States Naval Academy Department of Economics.

    More about this item


    Business cycle accounting; Misspecification;

    JEL classification:

    • E10 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - General
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles


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