IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Fiscal Policies for Italy’s Fishing Industry: Theoretical and Empirical Aspects

  • Massimo Del Gatto

The solution to the problem of over-fishing offered by catch-effort models is a reduction in capital invested. Fishery policy, both European and Italian, is constructed entirely on the basis of this idea. Applying the same theoretical apparatus, we show that fiscal policies can be used in order to achieve the same goal. Furthermore, evaluation of the tax burden for Italian sea-fishing firms raises various points on the basis of which present fishery policy is found wanting with respect to its own theoretical apparatus (catch-effort models). Subsidies for definitive withdrawal and equipment renewal are opportune but economic problems regarding the efficiency of equipment will emerge if fiscal pressure is too high: firms will tend to withdraw from the market rather than renew their equipment. Since the Italian fishing sector comes under strong fiscal pressure we conclude that taxes should be effectively reduced and co-ordination with structural aid improved.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
Download Restriction: no

Article provided by Associazione Rossi Doria in its journal QA.

Volume (Year): (2002)
Issue (Month): 1 (May)

in new window

Handle: RePEc:rar:journl:0153
Contact details of provider: Postal: Via Silvio d'Amico 77, - 00145 Rome Italy
Phone: +39 06 57114743
Fax: +39 06 57114774
Web page:

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Matthiasson, T., 1995. "Why Fishing Fleets Tend to be "Too Big"?," Memorandum 20/1995, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
  2. Rögnvaldur Hannesson, 1994. "Optimum Fishing Capacity and International Transfer of Excess Allowable Catches," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 70(3), pages 330-344.
  3. Homans, Frances R. & Wilen, James E., 1997. "A Model of Regulated Open Access Resource Use," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 1-21, January.
  4. Segerson, Kathleen & Squires, Dale, 1995. "Measurement of Capacity Utilization for Revenue-Maximizing Firms," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(1), pages 77-84, January.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:rar:journl:0153. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ()

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.