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A Model for the Detection of Insurance Fraud*

Author

Listed:
  • El Bachir Belhadji
  • George Dionne

    () (Risk Management Chair, HEC-Montreal.)

  • Faouzi Tarkhani

Abstract

The aim of this article is to develop a model to aid insurance companies in their decision-making and to ensure that they are better equipped to fight fraud. This tool is based on the systematic use of fraud indicators. We first propose a procedure to isolate the indicators which are most significant in predicting the probability that a claim may be fraudulent. We applied the procedure to data collected in the Dionne–Belhadji study (1996). The model allowed us to observe that 23 of the 54 indicators used were significant in predicting the probability of fraud. Our study also discusses the model's accuracy and detection capability. The detection rates obtained by the adjusters who participated in the study constitute the reference point of this discussion. As shown in the Caron–Dionne (1998), there is the possibility that these rates underestimate the true level of fraud. The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance (2000) 25, 517–538. doi:10.1111/1468-0440.00080

Suggested Citation

  • El Bachir Belhadji & George Dionne & Faouzi Tarkhani, 2000. "A Model for the Detection of Insurance Fraud*," The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance - Issues and Practice, Palgrave Macmillan;The Geneva Association, vol. 25(4), pages 517-538, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:pal:gpprii:v:25:y:2000:i:4:p:517-538
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Georges Dionne, 2012. "The Empirical Measure of Information Problems with Emphasis on Insurance Fraud and Dynamic Data," Cahiers de recherche 1233, CIRPEE.
    2. Viaene, Stijn & Ayuso, Mercedes & Guillen, Montserrat & Van Gheel, Dirk & Dedene, Guido, 2007. "Strategies for detecting fraudulent claims in the automobile insurance industry," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 176(1), pages 565-583, January.
    3. Georges Dionne & Florence Giuliano & Pierre Picard, 2009. "Optimal Auditing with Scoring: Theory and Application to Insurance Fraud," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 55(1), pages 58-70, January.
    4. Jörg Schiller, 2006. "The Impact of Insurance Fraud Detection Systems," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 73(3), pages 421-438.
    5. G. Dionne & F. Giuliano & P. Picard, 2002. "Optimal auditing for insurance fraud," THEMA Working Papers 2002-32, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    6. Jean Pinquet & Mercedes Ayuso & Montserrat Guillén, 2007. "Selection Bias and Auditing Policies for Insurance Claims," Journal of Risk & Insurance, The American Risk and Insurance Association, vol. 74(2), pages 425-440.
    7. Yufei Jin & Roderick Rejesus & Bertis Little, 2005. "Binary choice models for rare events data: a crop insurance fraud application," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(7), pages 841-848.
    8. Bermúdez, Ll. & Pérez, J.M. & Ayuso, M. & Gómez, E. & Vázquez, F.J., 2008. "A Bayesian dichotomous model with asymmetric link for fraud in insurance," Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 779-786, April.
    9. Stijn Viaene & Guido Dedene, 2004. "Insurance Fraud: Issues and Challenges," The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance - Issues and Practice, Palgrave Macmillan;The Geneva Association, vol. 29(2), pages 313-333, April.

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