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Thresholds in the Finance-Growth Nexus: A Cross-Country Analysis

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  • Hakan Yilmazkuday

Abstract

Thresholds of inflation, government size, trade openness, and per capita income for the finance-growth nexus are investigated using five-year averages of standard variables for 84 countries from 1965 to 2004. The results suggest that (i) high inflation crowds out positive effects of financial depth on long-run growth, (ii) small government sizes hurt the finance-growth nexus in low-income countries, while large government sizes hurt high-income countries, (iii) low levels of trade openness are sufficient for finance-growth nexus in high-income countries, but low-income countries need higher levels of trade openness for similar magnitudes of the finance-growth nexus, (iv) catch-up effects through the finance-growth nexus are higher for moderate per capita income levels. Copyright , Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Hakan Yilmazkuday, 2011. "Thresholds in the Finance-Growth Nexus: A Cross-Country Analysis," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 25(2), pages 278-295, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:wbecrv:v:25:y:2011:i:2:p:278-295
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    Cited by:

    1. Hasan, Iftekhar & Horvath, Roman & Mares, Jan, 2015. "What type of finance matters for growth? Bayesian model averaging evidence," Research Discussion Papers 17/2015, Bank of Finland.
    2. Owen, Ann L. & Temesvary, Judit, 2012. "Foreign lending, local lending, and economic growth," MPRA Paper 39978, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Herwartz, Helmut & Walle, Yabibal M., 2014. "Determinants of the link between financial and economic development: Evidence from a functional coefficient model," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 417-427.
    4. Petra Valickova & Tomas Havranek & Roman Horvath, 2015. "Financial Development And Economic Growth: A Meta-Analysis," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(3), pages 506-526, July.
    5. Deniz Baglan & Hakan Yilmazkuday, 2016. "Financial Health and the Intensive Margin of Trade," Working Papers 1607, Florida International University, Department of Economics.
    6. Andersson, Fredrik N.G. & Burzynska, Katarzyna & Opper, Sonja, 2014. "Lending for Growth? A Granger Causality Analysis of China's Finance-Growth Nexus," Knut Wicksell Working Paper Series 2014/6, Lund University, Knut Wicksell Centre for Financial Studies.
    7. Arshad Ali Bhatti & M. Emranul Haque & Denise R. Osborn, 2013. "Is the Growth Effect of Financial Development Conditional on Technological Innovation?," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 188, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    8. Altinok, Nadir & Aydemir, Abdurrahman, 2017. "Does one size fit all? The impact of cognitive skills on economic growth," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 176-190.
    9. Muhammad Khan, 2013. "Inflation and Sectoral Output Growth Variability in Bulgaria," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 55(4), pages 687-704, December.
    10. Owen, Ann L. & Temesvary, Judit, 2014. "Heterogeneity in the growth and finance relationship: How does the impact of bank finance vary by country and type of lending?," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 275-288.
    11. Abdullahi Ahmed & Andrew Hulten, 2014. "Financial Globalization in Botswana and Nigeria: A Critique of the Thresholds Paradigm," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 41(2), pages 177-203, June.
    12. Leon-Gonzalez, Roberto & Vinayagathasan, Thanabalasingam, 2015. "Robust determinants of growth in Asian developing economies: A Bayesian panel data model averaging approach," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 34-46.
    13. Jean-pierre Allegret & Sana Azzabi, 2013. "Financial development, threshold effects and convergence in developing and emerging countries," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(3), pages 1899-1921.
    14. Önder, Ali Sina & Yilmazkuday, Hakan, 2016. "Trade partner diversification and growth: How trade links matter," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 241-258.
    15. Herwartz, Helmut & Walle, Yabibal M., 2014. "Openness and the finance-growth nexus," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 235-247.
    16. Nahed Zghidi & Zouheir Abida, 2014. "Financial Development, Trade Openness and Economic Growth in North African Countries," Romanian Economic Journal, Department of International Business and Economics from the Academy of Economic Studies Bucharest, vol. 17(53), pages 91-120, September.
    17. repec:eee:revfin:v:33:y:2017:i:c:p:12-28 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Jean-Pierre Allegret & Sana Azzabi, 2012. "Développement financier, croissance de long terme et effets de seuil," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 59(5), pages 553-581, December.
    19. Marques, Luís Miguel & Fuinhas, José Alberto & Marques, António Cardoso, 2013. "Does the stock market cause economic growth? Portuguese evidence of economic regime change," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 316-324.
    20. Mu-Shun Wang, 2013. "An Investigation of the Feldstein–Horioka Puzzle for the Association of Southeast Asian Nations Economies," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 46(4), pages /, December.
    21. Adeniyi, Oluwatosin & Oyinlola, Abimbola & Omisakin, Olusegun & Egwaikhide, Festus O., 2015. "Financial development and economic growth in Nigeria: Evidence from threshold modelling," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 11-21.
    22. Pasali, Selahattin Selsah, 2013. "Where is the cheese ? synthesizing a giant literature on causes and consequences of financial sector development," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6655, The World Bank.
    23. Fredrik N. G. Andersson & Katarzyna Burzynska & Sonja Opper, 2016. "Lending for growth? A Granger causality analysis of China’s finance–growth nexus," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 51(3), pages 897-920, November.
    24. repec:bof:bofrdp:urn:nbn:fi:bof-201508211364 is not listed on IDEAS

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