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Capital structure and corporate performance in late Imperial Russia

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  • Amanda Gregg
  • Steven Nafziger

Abstract

This article investigates the financing of corporations in industrialization’s early stages by examining new balance sheet data describing all Imperial Russian corporations in 1914. We emphasize differences between two Russian corporation types: share partnerships and A-corporations. Share partnerships issued greater dividends, were less likely to issue bonds, and had larger accounts payable. We find that capital structures varied with age, size, and sector according to modern corporate finance theories and that scaled profits did not demonstrate differential market power across corporation types. Thus, Russian corporations exhibited considerable financial flexibility, and reducing incorporation costs could have benefited the Imperial Russian economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Amanda Gregg & Steven Nafziger, 2019. "Capital structure and corporate performance in late Imperial Russia," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 23(4), pages 446-481.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ereveh:v:23:y:2019:i:4:p:446-481.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/ereh/hey020
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    Cited by:

    1. Gregg, Amanda & Nafziger, Steven, 2020. "Financing nascent industry : Leverage, politics, and performance in Imperial Russia," BOFIT Discussion Papers 7/2020, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    2. Tomihiro Machikita & Tetsuji Okazaki, 2019. "Transition to a Modern Regime and Change in PlantLifecycles: A Natural Experiment from Meiji Japan," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-1122, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.

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