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Parental Unemployment and Child Health

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  • Eva Mörk
  • Anna Sjögren
  • Helena Svaleryd

Abstract

We analyze to what extent health outcomes of Swedish children are worse among children whose parents become unemployed. To this end we combine Swedish hospitalization data for 1992-2007 for children 3-18 years of age with register data on parental unemployment. We find that children with unemployed parents are 17% more likely to be hospitalized than other children, but that most of the difference is driven by selection. A child fixed-effects approach suggests a small effect of parental unemployment on child health. (JEL-codes: I12, J13)

Suggested Citation

  • Eva Mörk & Anna Sjögren & Helena Svaleryd, 2014. "Parental Unemployment and Child Health," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 60(2), pages 366-401.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:cesifo:v:60:y:2014:i:2:p:366-401.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/cesifo/ifu016
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    9. Mari Rege & Kjetil Telle & Mark Votruba, 2011. "Parental Job Loss and Children's School Performance," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 78(4), pages 1462-1489.
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    11. Marianne Page & Ann Huff Stevens & Jason Lindo, 2007. "Parental Income Shocks and Outcomes of Disadvantaged Youth in the United States," NBER Chapters, in: The Problems of Disadvantaged Youth: An Economic Perspective, pages 213-235, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Marianne Page & Jessamyn Schaller & David Simon, 2019. "The Effects of Aggregate and Gender-Specific Labor Demand Shocks on Child Health," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 54(1), pages 37-78.
    2. Lee, Y-W.;, 2019. "Effects of Parental Job Loss and Insecurity on Children’s Health: Evidence from Korea," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 19/09, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    3. Pieters, Janneke & Rawlings, Samantha, 2016. "Parental Unemployment and Child Health in China," IZA Discussion Papers 10021, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Mörk, Eva & Sjögren, Anna & Svaleryd, Helena, 2019. "Consequences of parental job loss on the family environment and on human capital formation - Evidence from plant closures," Working Paper Series 2019:7, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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