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Urban form, travel time, and cost relationships with tour complexity and mode choice

Author

Listed:
  • Lawrence Frank

    ()

  • Mark Bradley

    ()

  • Sarah Kavage

    ()

  • James Chapman

    ()

  • T. Lawton

    ()

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Lawrence Frank & Mark Bradley & Sarah Kavage & James Chapman & T. Lawton, 2008. "Urban form, travel time, and cost relationships with tour complexity and mode choice," Transportation, Springer, vol. 35(1), pages 37-54, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:transp:v:35:y:2008:i:1:p:37-54
    DOI: 10.1007/s11116-007-9136-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Sallis, James F. & Frank, Lawrence D. & Saelens, Brian E. & Kraft, M. Katherine, 2004. "Active transportation and physical activity: opportunities for collaboration on transportation and public health research," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 249-268, May.
    2. Handy, Susan & Cao, Xinyu & Mokhtarian, Patricia L., 2005. "Correlation or causality between the built environment and travel behavior? Evidence from Northern California," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt5b76c5kg, University of California Transportation Center.
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