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Radical scholarship taking on the mainstream: Murray Rothbard’s contribution

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  • Benjamin Powell

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  • Edward Stringham

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Abstract

Does one have to make a choice between ideological purity and success as an economist? Many free-market economists believe that one has to choose one or the other. Murray Rothbard (1926–1995) held views on economics and government far outside the accepted mainstream. Nevertheless he was extremely prolific in both mainstream and non-mainstream outlets and his work has influenced many people. This article surveys Rothbard’s contributions to top ranked economics journals and discusses some of the attention his work received in those journals and elsewhere. Rothbard left a bold and uncompromising research program in political economy that has inspired many to follow. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Suggested Citation

  • Benjamin Powell & Edward Stringham, 2012. "Radical scholarship taking on the mainstream: Murray Rothbard’s contribution," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 25(4), pages 315-327, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:revaec:v:25:y:2012:i:4:p:315-327
    DOI: 10.1007/s11138-011-0167-z
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Benjamin Powell & Edward Stringham, 2009. "Public choice and the economic analysis of anarchy: a survey," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 140(3), pages 503-538, September.
    2. Powell, Benjamin & Wilson, Bart J., 2008. "An experimental investigation of Hobbesian jungles," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 66(3-4), pages 669-686, June.
    3. Edward Stringham & Todd Zywicki, 2011. "Rivalry and superior dispatch: an analysis of competing courts in medieval and early modern England," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 147(3), pages 497-524, June.
    4. Peter Leeson, 2008. "Coordination without command: Stretching the scope of spontaneous order," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 135(1), pages 67-78, April.
    5. Vaughn,Karen I., 1994. "Austrian Economics in America," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521445528, May.
    6. Peter T. Leeson, 2007. "Trading with Bandits," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 50, pages 303-321.
    7. Daniel B. Klein, 2009. "Desperately Seeking Smithians: Responses to the Questionnaire about Building an Identity," Econ Journal Watch, Econ Journal Watch, vol. 6(1), pages 113-180, January.
    8. Peter T. Leeson, 2009. "The Laws of Lawlessness," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 38(2), pages 471-503, June.
    9. Stringham, Edward Peter & Zywicki, Todd J., 2011. "Hayekian anarchism," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 78(3), pages 290-301, May.
    10. Peter Leeson, 2007. "Efficient anarchy," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 130(1), pages 41-53, January.
    11. Powell, Benjamin & Ford, Ryan & Nowrasteh, Alex, 2008. "Somalia after state collapse: Chaos or improvement?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 67(3-4), pages 657-670, September.
    12. Peter T. Leeson, 2007. "An-arrgh-chy: The Law and Economics of Pirate Organization," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 115(6), pages 1049-1094, December.
    13. Edward Stringham, 2006. "Overlapping Jurisdictions, Proprietary Communities, and Competition in the Realm of Law," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 162(3), pages 516-534, September.
    14. Philippe Robert-Demontrond & R. Ringoot, 2004. "Introduction," Post-Print halshs-00081823, HAL.
    15. Peter T. Leeson, 2008. "Social Distance and Self-Enforcing Exchange," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 37(1), pages 161-188, January.
    16. Klein, Peter G, 1996. "Economic Calculation and the Limits of Organization," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 9(2), pages 3-28.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    History of thought; Austrian school of economics; Libertarian political economy; B25; B31; B53;

    JEL classification:

    • B25 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary; Austrian; Stockholm School
    • B31 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought: Individuals - - - Individuals
    • B53 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Austrian

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