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When Can a News Organization Lead Public Opinion? Ideology versus Market Forces in Decisions to Make News

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  • Bovitz, Gregory L
  • Druckman, James N
  • Lupia, Arthur

Abstract

Do news organizations purposefully lead the public to support a particular ideological agenda? When debating this question, many analysts draw conclusions from weak empirical evidence. We introduce a model that clarifies how a news organization's internal structure combines with market forces to affect when it can lead public opinion. We identify conditions under which liberal reporters or politically-driven media magnates can achieve ideological goals. We also illuminate important barriers that prevent many would-be public opinion leaders from ever satisfying these conditions. We show that internal structure and market forces are critical determinants of any news organization's power over public opinion. Copyright 2002 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

Suggested Citation

  • Bovitz, Gregory L & Druckman, James N & Lupia, Arthur, 2002. "When Can a News Organization Lead Public Opinion? Ideology versus Market Forces in Decisions to Make News," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 113(1-2), pages 127-155, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:113:y:2002:i:1-2:p:127-55
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ascensión Andina-Díaz, 2009. "Media competition and information disclosure," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 33(2), pages 261-280, August.
    2. Ascensión Andina-Díaz & José A. García-Martínez, 2014. "Media silence, feedback power and reputation," Working Papers 2014-03, Universidad de Málaga, Department of Economic Theory, Málaga Economic Theory Research Center.
    3. Vincent Bignon & Marc Flandreau, 2012. "The Price of Media Capture and the Looting of Newspapers in Interwar France," IHEID Working Papers 09-2012, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies.
    4. Petrova, Maria, 2012. "Mass media and special interest groups," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 17-38.
    5. John Lott & Kevin Hassett, 2014. "Is newspaper coverage of economic events politically biased?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 160(1), pages 65-108, July.
    6. repec:taf:oabmxx:v:4:y:2017:i:1:p:1297212 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Bignon, Vincent & Flandreau, Marc, 2014. "The Price of Media Capture and the Debasement of the French Newspaper Industry During the Interwar," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 74(03), pages 799-830, September.
    8. Marcel Garz, 2014. "Good news and bad news: evidence of media bias in unemployment reports," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 161(3), pages 499-515, December.
    9. repec:kap:pubcho:v:174:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11127-017-0485-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Baron, David P., 2004. "Persistent Media Bias," Research Papers 1845r, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
    11. Petrova, Maria, 2008. "Inequality and media capture," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(1-2), pages 183-212, February.
    12. Ascensión Andina-Díaz, 2007. "Reinforcement vs. change: The political influence of the media," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 131(1), pages 65-81, April.
    13. Jiancai Pi, 2010. "Media Capture and Local Government Accountability," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2010(3), pages 273-283.
    14. Baron, David P., 2003. "Competing for the Public through the News Media," Research Papers 1808, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
    15. Matthias Heinz & Johan Swinnen, 2013. "Media Bias in Economic News: A Factor 20," LICOS Discussion Papers 33013, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    16. Baron, David P., 2006. "Persistent media bias," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(1-2), pages 1-36, January.
    17. Garcia Pires, Armando J., 2014. "Media diversity, advertising, and adaptation of news to readers’ political preferences," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 28-38.

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