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White Residential Segregation in U.S. Metropolitan Areas: Conceptual Issues, Patterns, and Trends from the U.S. Census, 1980 to 2010

  • John Iceland

    ()

  • Gregory Sharp
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    Racial and ethnic diversity continues to spread to communities across the United States. Rather than focus on the residential patterns of specific minority or immigrant groups, this study examines changing patterns of White residential segregation in metropolitan America. Using data from the 1980 to 2010 decennial censuses, we calculate levels of White segregation using two common measures, analyze the effect of defining the White population in different ways, and, drawing upon the group threat theoretical perspective, we examine the metropolitan correlates of White segregation. We find that White segregation from others declined significantly from 1980 to 2010, regardless of the measure of segregation or the White population used. However, we find some evidence consistent with the group threat perspective, as White dissimilarity is higher in metro areas that are more diverse, and especially those with larger Black populations. Nevertheless, our findings indicate that Whites having been living in increasingly integrated neighborhoods over the last few decades, suggesting some easing of the historical color line. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11113-013-9277-6
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    Article provided by Springer in its journal Population Research and Policy Review.

    Volume (Year): 32 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 5 (October)
    Pages: 663-686

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    Handle: RePEc:kap:poprpr:v:32:y:2013:i:5:p:663-686
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=102983

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    1. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser & Jacob L. Vigdor, 1997. "The Rise and Decline of the American Ghetto," NBER Working Papers 5881, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. William Frey & Reynolds Farley, 1996. "Latino, Asian, and black segregation in U.S. metropolitan areas: Are multiethnic metros different," Demography, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 35-50, February.
    3. Sapna Swaroop & Maria Krysan, 2011. "The Determinants of Neighborhood Satisfaction: Racial Proxy Revisited," Demography, Springer, vol. 48(3), pages 1203-1229, August.
    4. Brian Duncan & Stephen J. Trejo, 2011. "Tracking Intergenerational Progress for Immigrant Groups: The Problem of Ethnic Attrition," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(3), pages 603-08, May.
    5. John Logan & Brian Stults & Reynolds Farley, 2004. "Segregation of minorities in the metropolis: two decades of change," Demography, Springer, vol. 41(1), pages 1-22, February.
    6. John Iceland & Gregory Sharp & Jeffrey Timberlake, 2013. "Sun Belt Rising: Regional Population Change and the Decline in Black Residential Segregation, 1970–2009," Demography, Springer, vol. 50(1), pages 97-123, February.
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