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The Determinants of Neighborhood Satisfaction: Racial Proxy Revisited

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  • Sapna Swaroop

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  • Maria Krysan

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Sapna Swaroop & Maria Krysan, 2011. "The Determinants of Neighborhood Satisfaction: Racial Proxy Revisited," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(3), pages 1203-1229, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:48:y:2011:i:3:p:1203-1229
    DOI: 10.1007/s13524-011-0047-y
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s13524-011-0047-y
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. William Clark, 1992. "Residential preferences and residential choices in a multiethnic context," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 29(3), pages 451-466, August.
    2. Barrett Lee & R. Oropesa & James Kanan, 1994. "Neighborhood Context and Residential Mobility," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 31(2), pages 249-270, May.
    3. W. Clark, 1991. "Residential preferences and neighborhood racial segregation: A test of the schelling segregation model," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 28(1), pages 1-19, February.
    4. Maria Krysan, 2002. "Whites who say they’d flee: Who are they, and why would they leave?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 39(4), pages 675-696, November.
    5. Brian Stipak & Carl Hensler, 1983. "Effect of neighborhood racial and socioeconomic composition on urban residents' evaluations of their neighborhoods," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 311-320, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Verena Dill & Uwe Jirjahn & Georgi Tsertsvadze, 2015. "Residential Segregation and Immigrants’ Satisfaction with the Neighborhood in Germany," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 96(2), pages 354-368, June.
    2. Verena Dill & Uwe Jirjahn, 2011. "Ethnic Residential Segregation and Immigrants' Perceptions of Discrimination in West Germany," Research Papers in Economics 2011-10, University of Trier, Department of Economics.
    3. Boschman, Sanne & Kleinhans, Reinout & van Ham, Maarten, 2014. "Ethnic Differences in Realising Desires to Leave the Neighbourhood," IZA Discussion Papers 8461, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Herbst, Chris M. & Lucio, Joanna, 2014. "Happy in the Hood? The Impact of Residential Segregation on Self-Reported Happiness," IZA Discussion Papers 7944, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. John Iceland & Gregory Sharp, 2013. "White Residential Segregation in U.S. Metropolitan Areas: Conceptual Issues, Patterns, and Trends from the U.S. Census, 1980 to 2010," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 32(5), pages 663-686, October.

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