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A currency transactions tax, why and how

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  • James Tobin

Abstract

The crises and defections that afflicted the European Monetary System in 1992–93 are convincing recent demonstrations that adjustable pegs are not viable. At the same time, experience since 1971 has not fulfilled the more extreme claims of the advocates of floating rates. Transactions taxes are an innocuous way to throw some sand in the wheels of super-efficient financial markets and create room for differences in domestic interest rates, thus enabling national monetary policies to respond to domestic macroeconomic needs. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Suggested Citation

  • James Tobin, 1996. "A currency transactions tax, why and how," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 7(1), pages 493-499, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:openec:v:7:y:1996:i:1:p:493-499
    DOI: 10.1007/BF01886209
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Eichengreen, Barry & Tobin, James & Wyplosz, Charles, 1995. "Two Cases for Sand in the Wheels of International Finance," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 105(428), pages 162-172, January.
    2. James Tobin, 1978. "A Proposal for International Monetary Reform," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 4(3-4), pages 153-159, Jul/Oct.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Financial transactions taxes: FTT?
      by Steve Cecchetti and Kim Schoenholtz in Money, Banking and Financial Markets on 2015-10-26 17:22:04

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kant, Chander, 2005. "Capital mobility among advanced countries," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 27(9), pages 1067-1081, December.
    2. repec:mtp:titles:0262037165 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Anna M.Variato, 2003. "The Keynesian Root of the Tobin tax," Working Papers (-2012) 0305, University of Bergamo, Department of Economics.
    4. Peter Flaschel & Florian Hartmann & Christopher Malikane & Christian Proaño, 2015. "A Behavioral Macroeconomic Model of Exchange Rate Fluctuations with Complex Market Expectations Formation," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 45(4), pages 669-691, April.
    5. Pompeo Della Posta, 2002. "Modelli di crisi valutarie e misure di politica economica," Moneta e Credito, Economia civile, vol. 55(219), pages 237-262.
    6. Dominick Salvatore, 2000. "The Present International Monetary System: Problems, Complications, and Reforms," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 11(1), pages 133-148, August.
    7. Rieger, Jörg, 2014. "Financial Transaction Tax and Financial Market Stability with Diverse Beliefs," Working Papers 0563, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
    8. George Furstenberg, 1998. "From Worldwide Capital Mobility to International Financial Integration: A Review Essay," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 53-84, January.

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