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Externalities of Urban Renewal: A Real Option Perspective

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  • K. Chau

    ()

  • S. Wong

    ()

Abstract

If carefully planned, urban renewal may play an important role in regenerating a decaying neighborhood and mitigating the negative externality generated by dilapidated buildings in densely populated areas. Despite its potential benefits, in urban areas dominated by high-rise developments, urban renewal has an unintended negative impact on nearby properties since it reduces their redevelopment option values. In this study, we develop a number of hypotheses on how an urban renewal project, once made known to the public, affects neighborhood housing prices and test them with data in Hong Kong. Our empirical findings suggest that the degree of positive externalities brought by urban renewal depends on the scale of an urban renewal project, as well as the amount of commercial areas included in the project. Most importantly, through examining changes in the age coefficient, we found that an urban renewal project reduces the value of nearby buildings beyond the boundaries of the project. The negative effect was stronger for older buildings and for those buildings located closer to the project’s boundaries. These unintended consequences of urban renewal have not been analyzed or tested in previous studies. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Suggested Citation

  • K. Chau & S. Wong, 2014. "Externalities of Urban Renewal: A Real Option Perspective," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 48(3), pages 546-560, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jrefec:v:48:y:2014:i:3:p:546-560
    DOI: 10.1007/s11146-013-9418-z
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Clapp, John M. & Bardos, Katsiaryna Salavei & Wong, S.K., 2012. "Empirical estimation of the option premium for residential redevelopment," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1-2), pages 240-256.
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    7. Benson, Earl D & Hansen, Julia L. & Schwartz Jr., Arthur & Smersh, Greg T., 1998. "Pricing Residential Amenities: The Value of a View," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 55-73, January.
    8. Rueter, Frederick H, 1973. "Externalities in Urban Property Markets: An Empirical Test of the Zoning Ordinance of Pittsburgh," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(2), pages 313-349, October.
    9. Clapp, John M. & Salavei, Katsiaryna, 2010. "Hedonic pricing with redevelopment options: A new approach to estimating depreciation effects," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(3), pages 362-377, May.
    10. Otto A. Davis & Andrew Whinston, 1962. "Externalities, Welfare, and the Theory of Games," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 70, pages 241-241.
    11. Rosenthal Stuart S. & Helsley Robert W., 1994. "Redevelopment and the Urban Land Price Gradient," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 182-200, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Chong Peng & Tingzhen Ming & Jianquan Cheng & Yongjia Wu & Zhong-Ren Peng, 2015. "Modeling Thermal Comfort and Optimizing Local Renewal Strategies—A Case Study of Dazhimen Neighborhood in Wuhan City," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(3), pages 1-20, March.
    2. Julia Freybote & Hua Sun & Xi Yang, 2015. "The Impact of LEED Neighborhood Certification on Condo Prices," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 43(3), pages 586-608, September.

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