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Measuring geographic segregation: a graph-based approach

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  • Seong-Yun Hong

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  • Yukio Sadahiro

Abstract

Residential segregation is a multidimensional phenomenon that encompasses several conceptually distinct aspects of geographical separation between populations. While various indices have been developed as a response to different definitions of segregation, the reliance on such single-figure indices could oversimplify the complex, multidimensional phenomena. In this regard, this paper suggests an alternative graph-based approach that provides more detailed information than simple indices: The concentration profile graphically conveys information about how evenly a population group is distributed over the study region, and the spatial proximity profile depicts the degree of clustering across different threshold levels. These graphs can also be summarized into single numbers for comparative purposes, but the interpretation can be more accurate by inspecting the additional information. To demonstrate the use of these methods, the residential patterns of three major ethnic groups in Auckland, namely Māori, Pacific peoples, and Asians, are examined using the 2006 census data. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Seong-Yun Hong & Yukio Sadahiro, 2014. "Measuring geographic segregation: a graph-based approach," Journal of Geographical Systems, Springer, vol. 16(2), pages 211-231, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jgeosy:v:16:y:2014:i:2:p:211-231
    DOI: 10.1007/s10109-013-0190-7
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10109-013-0190-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Michael Poulsen, 2002. "Plural Cities and Ethnic Enclaves: Introducing a Measurement Procedure for Comparative Study," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(2), pages 229-243, June.
    2. Rebecca Allen & Simon Burgess & Frank Windmeijer, 2009. "More Reliable Inference for Segregation Indices," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 09/216, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    3. Ron Johnston & Michael Poulsen & James Forrest, 2011. "Evaluating Changing Residential Segregation In Auckland, New Zealand, Using Spatial Statistics," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 102(1), pages 1-23, February.
    4. Dorfman, Robert, 1979. "A Formula for the Gini Coefficient," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 61(1), pages 146-149, February.
    5. Hutchens, Robert M., 1991. "Segregation curves, Lorenz curves, and inequality in the distribution of people across occupations," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 31-51, February.
    6. Sean Reardon & Stephen Matthews & David O’Sullivan & Barrett Lee & Glenn Firebaugh & Chad Farrell & Kendra Bischoff, 2008. "The geographic scale of Metropolitan racial segregation," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 45(3), pages 489-514, August.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Segregation measures; Residential segregation; Segregation profiles; Concentration profile; Spatial proximity profile; C4; C43; J15;

    JEL classification:

    • C4 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics
    • C43 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Index Numbers and Aggregation
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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