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Evaluating Changing Residential Segregation in Auckland, New Zealand, Using Spatial Statistics

Author

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  • Ron Johnston
  • Michael Poulsen
  • James Forrest

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Abstract

Much work on residential segregation in urban areas has focused on aspatial indices of urban residential segregation, largely ignoring locational aspects of the degree of spatial separation of different ethnic groups. The adoption of measures of global and local spatial autocorrelation has recently been suggested as a way of introducing a more explicit spatial approach to studying segregation. This paper uses two of those measures – Moran’s I and Getis and Ord’s G* – to explore segregation of the four main ethnic groups in Auckland, New Zealand’s largest and most multi-ethnic city, at the four most recent censuses held there. They are used to identify the clusters of census reporting units (meshblocks) where each group is significantly over- and under-represented, and to chart the degree of segregation within such clusters.

Suggested Citation

  • Ron Johnston & Michael Poulsen & James Forrest, 2009. "Evaluating Changing Residential Segregation in Auckland, New Zealand, Using Spatial Statistics," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 09/214, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  • Handle: RePEc:bri:cmpowp:09/214
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    Cited by:

    1. Seong-Yun Hong & Yukio Sadahiro, 2014. "Measuring geographic segregation: a graph-based approach," Journal of Geographical Systems, Springer, vol. 16(2), pages 211-231, April.
    2. David C. Maré & Andrew Coleman, 2011. "Estimating the determinants of population location in Auckland," Working Papers 11_07, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
    3. David C. Maré & Andrew Coleman & Ruth Pinkerton, 2011. "Patterns of population location in Auckland," Working Papers 11_06, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
    4. Richard Harris, 2011. "Measuring social segregation between London’s secondary schools, 2003 – 2008/9," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 11/260, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    5. repec:eee:exehis:v:67:y:2018:i:c:p:40-61 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Ignacio C. Fernández & David Manuel-Navarrete & Robinson Torres-Salinas, 2016. "Breaking Resilient Patterns of Inequality in Santiago de Chile: Challenges to Navigate towards a More Sustainable City," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(8), pages 1-19, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    segregation; ethnicity; Auckland; local statistics;

    JEL classification:

    • R1 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics

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