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Modeling Family Economic Conditions and Young Children’s Development in Rural United States: Implications for Poverty Research

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  • Kirsten Kainz

    ()

  • Michael Willoughby

    ()

  • Lynne Vernon-Feagans
  • Margaret Burchinal

Abstract

In this study we examined the additive and multiplicative relations between poverty status, material hardship, liquid assets, non-liquid assets, and children’s cognitive skills and social problems at 36 months. The data were from a representative sample of 1,292 children in six rural counties in the United States. Findings indicated that income, material hardship, and non-liquid assets explained unique variation in young children’s development. Material hardship was associated with more social problems for children. Poverty status was associated with lower cognitive skills, and non-liquid assets were associated with higher cognitive skills at 36 months. We concluded that models that estimate the relation between poverty and child outcomes without including measures of hardship and assets could be underspecified. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Suggested Citation

  • Kirsten Kainz & Michael Willoughby & Lynne Vernon-Feagans & Margaret Burchinal, 2012. "Modeling Family Economic Conditions and Young Children’s Development in Rural United States: Implications for Poverty Research," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 33(4), pages 410-420, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:33:y:2012:i:4:p:410-420
    DOI: 10.1007/s10834-012-9287-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. William Elliott & Hyunzee Jung & Terri Friedline, 2010. "Math Achievement and Children’s Savings: Implications for Child Development Accounts," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 31(2), pages 171-184, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yunhee Chang & Swarn Chatterjee & Jinhee Kim, 2014. "Household Finance and Food Insecurity," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(4), pages 499-515, December.
    2. William Elliott & Monique Constance-Huggins & Hyun-a Song, 2013. "Improving College Progress among Low- to Moderate-Income (LMI) Young Adults: The Role of Assets," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(4), pages 382-399, December.
    3. Jianghong Li & Matthias Pollmann-Schult, 2016. "Fathers’ Commute to Work and Children’s Social and Emotional Well-Being in Germany," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 488-501, September.
    4. Allison De Marco & Lynne Vernon-Feagans, 2015. "Child Care Subsidy Use and Child Care Quality in Low-Wealth, Rural Communities," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(3), pages 383-395, September.
    5. Leah Gjertson, 2016. "Emergency Saving and Household Hardship," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(1), pages 1-17, March.
    6. Md. Alauddin Majumder, 2016. "The Impact of Parenting Style on Children’s Educational Outcomes in the United States," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(1), pages 89-98, March.
    7. Jason Murasko, 2015. "The Age Profile of the Income–Health Gradient: An Evaluation of Two Large Cohorts of Contemporary US Children," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 289-298, June.

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    Keywords

    Poverty; Hardship; Assets; Child development;

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