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Population, health and risk factors in a transitional economy


  • Dan Petrovici


  • Christopher Ritson


This paper investigates the health status of the population in a transition economy. Against a background of falling living standards compounded by the widening income inequality a deterioration of health status has been outlined. Drawing upon a consumer survey carried out in the capital Bucharest, risk factors are highlighted. Respondents’ age, income, and health motivation are the most significant variables which differentiate between smokers and non-smokers. Respondent’s age and sex are significant factors predicting the physical exercise status. Additionally, respondent’s level of education is a significant predictor of the time spent on physical exercise. The implications of the study for health policy makers are finally discussed. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Suggested Citation

  • Dan Petrovici & Christopher Ritson, 2006. "Population, health and risk factors in a transitional economy," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 29(3), pages 279-300, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jcopol:v:29:y:2006:i:3:p:279-300
    DOI: 10.1007/s10603-006-9011-4

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Constantin Ogloblin & Gregory Brock, 2003. "Smoking in Russia: The ‘Marlboro Man’ Rides but Without ‘Virginia Slims’ for Now," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 45(1), pages 87-103, March.
    2. Kornai, Janos, 1992. "The Socialist System: The Political Economy of Communism," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198287766.
    3. Watson, Peggy, 1995. "Explaining rising mortality among men in Eastern Europe," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 41(7), pages 923-934, October.
    4. Gravelle, Hugh & Wildman, John & Sutton, Matthew, 2002. "Income, income inequality and health: what can we learn from aggregate data?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 54(4), pages 577-589, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Timo-Kolja Pförtner & Bart Clercq & Michela Lenzi & Alessio Vieno & Katharina Rathmann & Irene Moor & Anne Hublet & Michal Molcho & Anton Kunst & Matthias Richter, 2015. "Does the association between different dimension of social capital and adolescent smoking vary by socioeconomic status? a pooled cross-national analysis," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 60(8), pages 901-910, December.


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