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A Contingent Valuation Estimate of the Benefits of Wolves in Minnesota

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  • Catherine Chambers
  • John Whitehead

Abstract

In this paper we estimate the willingness topay for a wolf management plan and a wolfdamage plan in Minnesota using the contingentvaluation method. The theoretical definition ofwillingness to pay for wolf protection iscomposed of use and non-use values. Weincorporate a don't know response option in thedichotomous choice valuation questions. A largenumber of respondents answered don't know. Themultinomial logit model is used todifferentiate between don't know and noresponses. Non-use motives are importantfactors that explain willingness to pay. We usethese benefit estimates in combination with twoalternative cost estimates to consider theefficiency of the wolf management and damageplans. Both plans have estimated benefitsgreater than costs. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Suggested Citation

  • Catherine Chambers & John Whitehead, 2003. "A Contingent Valuation Estimate of the Benefits of Wolves in Minnesota," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 26(2), pages 249-267, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:26:y:2003:i:2:p:249-267
    DOI: 10.1023/A:1026356020521
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Loomis, John & Ekstrand, Earl, 1998. "Alternative approaches for incorporating respondent uncertainty when estimating willingness to pay: the case of the Mexican spotted owl," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 29-41, October.
    2. McConnell, K. E., 1997. "Does Altruism Undermine Existence Value?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 22-37, January.
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    4. Loomis, John B. & White, Douglas S., 1996. "Economic benefits of rare and endangered species: summary and meta-analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 197-206, September.
    5. Cameron, Trudy Ann, 1988. "A new paradigm for valuing non-market goods using referendum data: Maximum likelihood estimation by censored logistic regression," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 355-379, September.
    6. Richard T. Carson, 2011. "Contingent Valuation," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2489.
    7. Wang, Hua, 1997. "Treatment of "Don't-Know" Responses in Contingent Valuation Surveys: A Random Valuation Model," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 219-232, February.
    8. Haener, Michel K. & Adamowicz, Wiktor L., 1998. "Analysis Of "Don'T Know" Response To Referendum Contingent Valuation Questions," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 27(2), October.
    9. Kotchen, Matthew J. & Reiling, Stephen D., 2000. "Environmental attitudes, motivations, and contingent valuation of nonuse values: a case study involving endangered species," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 93-107, January.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. More environmental economics journal rankings
      by John Whitehead in Environmental Economics on 2009-05-15 18:34:48

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    Cited by:

    1. Kawata, Yukichika & Watanabe, Masahide, 2012. "Valuing the mortality risk of wildlife reintroduction: Heterogeneous risk preferences," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 79-86.
    2. Ojea, Elena & Loureiro, Maria L., 2011. "Identifying the scope effect on a meta-analysis of biodiversity valuation studies," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 706-724, September.
    3. Lehrer, David & Becker, Nir & Bar, Pua, 2010. "The economic impact of the invasion of Acacia saligna in Israel," MPRA Paper 33954, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Lili Reyes Hernandez & Melissa Yepes Tafur, 2013. "Evaluacion economica de preservar el mono titi cabeciblanco: Una aplicacion del metodo de valoracion contigente," REVISTA ECONOMÍA & REGIÓN, UNIVERSIDAD TECNOLÓGICA DE BOLÍVAR, vol. 7(1), pages 69-99, June.
    5. Göran Bostedt & Göran Ericsson & Jonas Kindberg, 2008. "Contingent values as implicit contracts: estimating minimum legal willingness to pay for conservation of large carnivores in Sweden," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 39(2), pages 189-198, February.
    6. Loureiro, Maria L. & Ojea, Elena, 2008. "Valuing local endangered species: The role of intra-species substitutes," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1-2), pages 362-369, December.
    7. Richardson, Leslie & Loomis, John, 2009. "The total economic value of threatened, endangered and rare species: An updated meta-analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(5), pages 1535-1548, March.
    8. Muhly, Tyler B. & Musiani, Marco, 2009. "Livestock depredation by wolves and the ranching economy in the Northwestern U.S," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(8-9), pages 2439-2450, June.
    9. Jin Jianjun, 2008. "Economic Valuation of Black-faced Spoonbill Conservation in Macao," EEPSEA Special and Technical Paper tp200801t2, Economy and Environment Program for Southeast Asia (EEPSEA), revised Jan 2008.
    10. Broberg, Thomas & Brännlund, Runar, 2006. "The value of preserving the four large predators in Sweden: Regional differences considered," Umeå Economic Studies 671, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
    11. Kelvin Balcombe & Iain Fraser, 2009. "Dichotomous-choice contingent valuation with 'dont know' responses and misreporting," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(7), pages 1137-1152.
    12. Melstrom, Richard T., 2014. "Managing apparent competition between the feral pigs and native foxes of Santa Cruz Island," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 157-162.

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    Keywords

    CVM; endangered species; willingness to pay;

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