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Pure eclecticism—The tool kit of the constitutional economist

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  • Stefan Voigt

Abstract

It is claimed here that the epistemics of constitutional economics has hitherto at best played a minor role but that dwelling on the epistemics might prove useful to understand why the positive branch of constitutional economics is not as far advanced as its normative counterpart. Four possible methods-namely comparative institutional analysis, economic history, conjectural history, and laboratory experiments-are analyzed with regard to their epistemic potential. It is hypothesized that conjectural history promises only little potential while the other three methods can be used to complement each other. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Suggested Citation

  • Stefan Voigt, 1996. "Pure eclecticism—The tool kit of the constitutional economist," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 7(3), pages 177-196, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:copoec:v:7:y:1996:i:3:p:177-196
    DOI: 10.1007/BF00128161
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Demsetz, Harold, 1969. "Information and Efficiency: Another Viewpoint," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 12(1), pages 1-22, April.
    2. MacLaren, Donald, 1994. "Economics, Agriculture and the Gatt," 1994 Conference (38th), February 8-10, 1994, Wellington, New Zealand 148472, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    3. Adam Przeworski & Fernando Limongi, 1993. "Political Regimes and Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 51-69, Summer.
    4. Peter Ordeshook, 1992. "Constitutional stability," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 3(2), pages 137-175, March.
    5. Vernon L. Smith, 1994. "Economics in the Laboratory," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 8(1), pages 113-131, Winter.
    6. Cass Sunstein, 1991. "Constitutionalism, prosperity, democracy: Transition in Eastern Europe," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 2(3), pages 371-394, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Voigt, Stefan, 2011. "Empirical constitutional economics: Onward and upward?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 80(2), pages 319-330.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    B41; K10; P51;

    JEL classification:

    • B41 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - Economic Methodology
    • K10 - Law and Economics - - Basic Areas of Law - - - General (Constitutional Law)
    • P51 - Economic Systems - - Comparative Economic Systems - - - Comparative Analysis of Economic Systems

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