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Monthly Pattern and Portfolio Effect on Higher Moments of Stock Returns: Empirical Evidence from Hong Kong

  • Gordon Tang

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    Using a direct test, this paper studies the month-of-the-year effect on the higher moments of six industrial stock indices of the Hong Kong market. We also examine the portfolio effect on skewness and kurtosis across month of the year to see if such an anomaly exists. The empirical results support a weak month-of-the-year effect in higher moments of stock returns. Using a complete sample of all possible combinations for each portfolio size, we show that portfolio effect varies across month of the year for both skewness and kurtosis. In particular, our results show that diversification does not necessarily provide benefits to rational investors when the stock return distribution is non-normal, even though portfolio formation can reduce standard deviation. In June, August and October, diversification across industrial sectors results in a more negatively skewed and leptokurtic return distribution, which is not preferred by investors with risk-aversion. Two (one) possible explanations for the portfolio effect on skewness (kurtosis) are also provided. Our empirical results add new evidence to the existence of anomalies in the Hong Kong stock market. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1023/A:1010006209727
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    Article provided by Springer in its journal Asia-Pacific Financial Markets.

    Volume (Year): 5 (1998)
    Issue (Month): 3 (November)
    Pages: 275-307

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    Handle: RePEc:kap:apfinm:v:5:y:1998:i:3:p:275-307
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    1. Simkowitz, Michael A. & Beedles, William L., 1978. "Diversification in a Three-Moment World," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(05), pages 927-941, December.
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