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Interactions within the Office Market Cycle in Great Britain

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Abstract

This article adopts an unrestricted vector autoregressive framework methodology to examine the cyclical activity of office property development in Great Britain. The empirical analysis provides supporting evidence for the significant influence of office rents on the rate of new office construction. Service sector output has a small impact on office development, whereas the results do not establish a relationship with employment and interest rates. The significance of rents is attributed to the tenure characteristics of the market and the important role of developers and property investors in initiating office projects in Great Britain. A period of up to three years appears to be the optimum period between the time that rental signals are generated and the time that buildings are put in place, as a response to those signals.

Suggested Citation

  • Tony McGough & Sotiris Tsolacos, 1999. "Interactions within the Office Market Cycle in Great Britain," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 18(1), pages 219-232.
  • Handle: RePEc:jre:issued:v:18:n:1:1999:p:219-232
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    File URL: http://pages.jh.edu/jrer/papers/pdf/past/vol18n01/v18p219.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Waldo L. Born & Stephen A. Pyhrr, 1994. "Real Estate Valuation: The Effect of Market and Property Cycles," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 9(4), pages 455-486.
    2. R Barras & D Ferguson, 1987. "Dynamic Modelling of the Building Cycle: 2. Empirical Results," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 19(4), pages 493-520, April.
    3. John S. Hekman, 1985. "Rental Price Adjustment and Investment in the Office Market," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 13(1), pages 32-47.
    4. Granger, C W J, 1969. "Investigating Causal Relations by Econometric Models and Cross-Spectral Methods," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 37(3), pages 424-438, July.
    5. John L. Kling & Thomas E. McCue, 1991. "Stylized Facts About Industrial Property Construction," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 6(3), pages 293-304.
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    Cited by:

    1. Barrett, Alan & Kearney, Ide & Goggin, Jean, 2008. "Quarterly Economic Commentary, Winter 2008," Forecasting Report, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number QEC20084, April.
    2. Jason Barr, 2010. "Skyscrapers and the Skyline: Manhattan, 1895-2004," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 38(3), pages 567-597.
    3. Franz Fuerst & Anna-Maija Grandy, "undated". ""Oft Expectation Fails": A Time-Series Analysis of Construction Starts in the London Office Market," Real Estate & Planning Working Papers rep-wp2010-13, Henley Business School, Reading University.
    4. McCartney, John, 2008. "An Empirical Analysis of Development Cycles in the Dublin Office Market 1976-2007," Quarterly Economic Commentary: Special Articles, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), vol. 2008(4-Winter), pages 68-92.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • L85 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Real Estate Services

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