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Foreign Direct Investment Intensity Effects On Tfp Intensity Of Asean 5 Plus 2

  • Elsadig Musa Ahmed

    ()

    (Economics Unit, Faculty of Business and Law, Multimedia University)

This study aims to investigate the role of foreign direct investment (FDI) intensity through decomposition of labour productivity growth into contributions of capital deepening, increased usage of foreign direct investment (FDI) intensity, and the simultaneous contribution of the quality of these factors. This has expressed as the contribution of total factor productivity (TFP) intensity growth in achieving productivity driven growth in ASEAN 5 (Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines, Singapore and Thailand) plus 2 (China and South Korea). This study claims to fill in the gaps of previous studies by developing applications of intensive growth theory and introducing the TFP intensity (TFP per unit of labour). The results show that the productivity growth of ASEAN 5 plus China and South Korea is input driven, however, South Korean Model has constructed companies such as Daewoo, Samsung and LG that competed globally. The study also finds that the impact of FDI intensity is positive with slight contribution to TFP intensity growth.

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Article provided by Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics in its journal Journal Of Economic Development.

Volume (Year): 33 (2008)
Issue (Month): 2 (December)
Pages: 155-166

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Handle: RePEc:jed:journl:v:33:y:2008:i:2:p:155-166
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  1. Mahadevan, R., 2001. "Assessing the output and productivity growth of Malaysia's manufacturing sector," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 587-597.
  2. John W. Kendrick, 1956. "Productivity Trends: Capital and Labor," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number kend56-1, May.
  3. John Kendrick, 1956. "Productivity Trends: Capital and Labor," NBER Chapters, in: Productivity Trends: Capital and Labor, pages -3-23 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Moses Abramovitz, 1956. "Resource and Output Trends in the United States Since 1870," NBER Chapters, in: Resource and Output Trends in the United States Since 1870, pages 1-23 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Rao, P S & Preston, R S, 1984. "Inter-factor Substitution, Economies of Scale and Technical Change: Evidence from Canadian Industries," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 87-111.
  6. Moses Abramovitz, 1956. "Resource and Output Trends in the United States Since 1870," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number abra56-1, May.
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