IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/jas/jasssj/1998-6-1.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Just How (Un)realistic Are Evolutionary Algorithms As Representations of Social Processes?

Author

Abstract

This paper attempts to illustrate the importance of a coherent behavioural interpretation in applying evolutionary algorithms like Genetic Algorithms and Genetic Programming to the modelling of social processes. It summarises and draws out the implications of the Neo-Darwinian Synthesis for processes of social evolution and then discusses the extent to which evolutionary algorithms capture the aspects of biological evolution which are relevant to social processes. The paper uses several recent papers in the field as case studies, discussing more and less successful uses of evolutionary algorithms in social science. The key aspects of evolution discussed in the paper are that it is dependent on relative rather than absolute fitness, it does not require global knowledge or a system level teleology, it avoids the credit assignment problem, it does not exclude Lamarckian inheritance and it is both progressive and open ended.

Suggested Citation

  • Edmund Chattoe-Brown, 1998. "Just How (Un)realistic Are Evolutionary Algorithms As Representations of Social Processes?," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 1(3), pages 1-2.
  • Handle: RePEc:jas:jasssj:1998-6-1
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://jasss.soc.surrey.ac.uk/1/3/2/2.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Thomas, Jonathan, 1993. "Non-computable rational expectations equilibria," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 133-142, February.
    2. repec:mes:jeciss:v:25:y:1991:i:2:p:519-533 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Marco Valente & Andrea Bassanini & Luigi Marengo & Giovanni Dosi, 1999. "Norms as emergent properties of adaptive learning: The case of economic routines," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 5-26.
    4. Vega-Redondo, Fernando (ed.), 1996. "Evolution, Games, and Economic Behaviour," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198774723.
    5. Simon, Herbert A, 1978. "Rationality as Process and as Product of Thought," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 68(2), pages 1-16, May.
    6. Arifovic, Jasmina & Eaton, Curtis, 1995. "Coordination via Genetic Learning," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 8(3), pages 181-203, August.
    7. Winston, Gordon C., 1987. "Activity choice : A new approach to economic behavior," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 8(4), pages 567-585, December.
    8. W. Brian Arthur, 1994. "Inductive Reasoning, Bounded Rationality and the Bar Problem," Working Papers 94-03-014, Santa Fe Institute.
    9. Armen A. Alchian, 1950. "Uncertainty, Evolution, and Economic Theory," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 58, pages 211-211.
    10. Pierre-André Chiappori, 1984. "Sélection naturelle et rationalité absolue des entreprises," Revue Économique, Programme National Persée, vol. 35(1), pages 87-108.
    11. Bullard, James & Duffy, John, 1998. "A model of learning and emulation with artificial adaptive agents," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 179-207, February.
    12. Arifovic, Jasmina, 1996. "The Behavior of the Exchange Rate in the Genetic Algorithm and Experimental Economies," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(3), pages 510-541, June.
    13. repec:mes:jeciss:v:16:y:1982:i:4:p:1005-1012 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Arthur, W Brian, 1994. "Inductive Reasoning and Bounded Rationality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 406-411, May.
    15. Tony Curson Price, 1997. "Using co-evolutionary programming to simulate strategic behaviour in markets," Levine's Working Paper Archive 588, David K. Levine.
    16. Tony Curzon Price, 1997. "Using co-evolutionary programming to simulate strategic behaviour in markets," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 7(3), pages 219-254.
    17. Arifovic, Jasmina, 1995. "Genetic algorithms and inflationary economies," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 219-243, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Hare, M & Deadman, P, 2004. "Further towards a taxonomy of agent-based simulation models in environmental management," Mathematics and Computers in Simulation (MATCOM), Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 25-40.
    2. José Castro Caldas & Helder Coelho, 1999. "The Origin of Institutions: Socio-Economic Processes, Choice, Norms and Conventions," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 2(2), pages 1-1.
    3. Tomas Klos, 1999. "Governance and Matching," Computing in Economics and Finance 1999 341, Society for Computational Economics.
    4. Balmann, Alfons & Musshoff, Oliver, 2002. "Real Options and Competition: The Impact of Depreciation and Reinvestment," 2002 International Congress, August 28-31, 2002, Zaragoza, Spain 24934, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Sylvie Geisendorf, 2011. "Internal selection and market selection in economic Genetic Algorithms," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 21(5), pages 817-841, December.
    6. Ludo Waltman & Nees Eck & Rommert Dekker & Uzay Kaymak, 2011. "Economic modeling using evolutionary algorithms: the effect of a binary encoding of strategies," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 21(5), pages 737-756, December.
    7. Pascal Seppecher & Isabelle Salle & Dany Lang, 2016. "Is the Market Really a Good Teacher? Market Selection, Collective Adaptation and Financial Instability," GREDEG Working Papers 2016-15, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis.
    8. Schnizler, Björn & Neumann, Dirk & Veit, Daniel & Napoletano, Mauro & Catalano, Michele & Gallegati, Mauro & Reinicke, Michael & Streitberger, Werner & Eymann, Torsten, 2005. "Environmental analysis for application layer networks," Bayreuth Reports on Information Systems Management 1, University of Bayreuth, Chair of Information Systems Management.
    9. Balmann, Alfons & Musshoff, Oliver, 2002. "Is The "Standard Real Options Approach" Appropriate For Investment Decisions In Hog Production?," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19897, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    10. Corniglion, Sébastien & Turnois, Nadine, 2011. "Simulating tourists' behaviour using multi-agent modelling," MPRA Paper 33526, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. repec:ags:gjagec:99009 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. repec:dgr:rugsom:99b41 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Alberto Acerbi & Domenico Parisi, 2006. "Cultural Transmission Between and Within Generations," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 9(1), pages 1-9.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:jas:jasssj:1998-6-1. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Flaminio Squazzoni). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.