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The development of the successful high tech sector in Israel, 1969-2009

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Listed:
  • Amir Shoham
  • Gil Avnimelech

Abstract

This article describes the events and processes that led to the development of the Israeli high tech cluster. Understanding the Israeli cluster is important because Israel is probably the most successful example of replication of the Silicon Valley model outside of North America. It explains the development of multiple factors, including sophisticated human capital, technological institutions and an open, global environment, that were crucial for building the Israeli high tech cluster. This is most important for policy makers who want to learn about the successful structuring of a high-technology innovative sector in a small, open economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Amir Shoham & Gil Avnimelech, 2012. "The development of the successful high tech sector in Israel, 1969-2009," World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 8(1), pages 53-69.
  • Handle: RePEc:ids:wremsd:v:8:y:2012:i:1:p:53-69
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Azulay, Israel & Lerner, Miri & Tishler, Asher, 2002. "Converting military technology through corporate entrepreneurship," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 419-435, March.
    2. Rachel M. Friedberg, 2001. "The Impact of Mass Migration on the Israeli Labor Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(4), pages 1373-1408.
    3. Gandal, Neil & Hanson, Gordon H. & Slaughter, M.J.Matthew J., 2004. "Technology, trade, and adjustment to immigration in Israel," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 403-428, April.
    4. Dan Breznitz, 2005. "Collaborative Public Space in a National Innovation System: A Case Study of the Israeli Military's Impact on the Software Industry," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 31-64.
    5. Gil Avnimelech, 2006. "A Five-phase Entrepreneurial Oriented Innovation and Technology Policy Profile: The Israeli Experience," European Planning Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(1), pages 81-98, August.
    6. Manuel Trajtenberg, 2002. "Government Support for Commercial R&D: Lessons from the Israeli Experience," NBER Chapters,in: Innovation Policy and the Economy, Volume 2, pages 79-134 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Avnimelech, Gil & Teubal, Morris, 2006. "Creating venture capital industries that co-evolve with high tech: Insights from an extended industry life cycle perspective of the Israeli experience," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(10), pages 1477-1498, December.
    8. Teubal, Morris, 1997. "A catalytic and evolutionary approach to horizontal technology policies (HTPs)," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(8), pages 1161-1188, January.
    9. G. Avnimelech & M. Teubal, 2008. "From Direct Support Of Business Sector R&D/Innovation To Targeting Venture Capital/Private Equity: A Catching-Up Innovation And Technology Policy Life Cycle Perspective," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(1-2), pages 153-172.
    10. Gil Avnimelech & Morris Teubal, 2004. "Venture capital start-up co-evolution and the emergence & development of Israel's new high tech cluster," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 33-60.
    11. Dafna Schwartz, 2006. "The Regional Location of Knowledge Based Economy Activities in Israel," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 31-44, January.
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