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Energy Transition: Missed Opportunities and Emerging Challenges for Landscape Planning and Designing

Author

Listed:
  • Renée M. de Waal

    () (Landscape Architecture Group, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands)

  • Sven Stremke

    () (Landscape Architecture Group, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands)

Abstract

Making the shift from fossil fuels to renewable energy seems inevitable. Because energy transition poses new challenges and opportunities to the discipline of landscape architecture, the questions addressed in this paper are: (1) what landscape architects can learn from successful energy transitions in Güssing, Jühnde and Samsø; and (2) to what extent landscape architecture (or other spatial disciplines) contributed to energy transition in the aforementioned cases. An exploratory, comparative case study was conducted to identify differences and similarities among the cases, to answer the research questions, and to formulate recommendations for further research and practice. The comparison indicated that the realized renewable energy systems are context-dependent and, therefore, specifically designed to meet the respective energy demand, making use of the available potentials for renewable energy generation and efficiency. Further success factors seemed to be the presence of (local) frontrunners and a certain degree of citizen participation. The relatively smooth implementation of renewable energy technologies in Jühnde and on Samsø may indicate the importance of careful and (partly) institutionalized consideration of landscape impact, siting and design. Comparing the cases against the literature demonstrated that landscape architects were not as involved as they, theoretically, could have been. However, particularly when the aim is sustainable development, rather than “merely” renewable energy provision, the integrative concept of “sustainable energy landscapes” can be the arena where landscape architecture and other disciplines meet to pursue global sustainability goals, while empowering local communities and safeguarding landscape quality.

Suggested Citation

  • Renée M. de Waal & Sven Stremke, 2014. "Energy Transition: Missed Opportunities and Emerging Challenges for Landscape Planning and Designing," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(7), pages 1-30, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:6:y:2014:i:7:p:4386-4415:d:38226
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Erik Laes & Leen Gorissen & Frank Nevens, 2014. "A Comparison of Energy Transition Governance in Germany, The Netherlands and the United Kingdom," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(3), pages 1-24, February.
    2. Arjan van Timmeren & Jonna Zwetsloot & Han Brezet & Sacha Silvester, 2012. "Sustainable Urban Regeneration Based on Energy Balance," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(7), pages 1-22, July.
    3. Sven Stremke & Jusuck Koh, 2010. "Ecological concepts and strategies with relevance to energy-conscious spatial planning and design," Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 37(3), pages 518-532, May.
    4. René Kemp, 2010. "The Dutch energy transition approach," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 7(2), pages 291-316, August.
    5. Joanna Williams, 2013. "The role of planning in delivering low-carbon urban infrastructure," Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 40(4), pages 683-706, July.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Qianna Wang & Martin Mwirigi M’Ikiugu & Isami Kinoshita & Yanyun Luo, 2016. "GIS-Based Approach for Municipal Renewable Energy Planning to Support Post-Earthquake Revitalization: A Japanese Case Study," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(7), pages 1-20, July.
    2. Renée M. de Waal & Sven Stremke & Anton van Hoorn & Ingrid Duchhart & Adri van den Brink, 2015. "Incorporating Renewable Energy Science in Regional Landscape Design: Results from a Competition in The Netherlands," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(5), pages 1-23, April.
    3. Sperling, Karl, 2017. "How does a pioneer community energy project succeed in practice? The case of the Samsø Renewable Energy Island," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 884-897.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    renewable energy; sustainable energy landscapes; landscape architecture; operational design; strategic design; climate change mitigation; transition management; Güssing; Jühnde; Samsø;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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