IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/fip/fedrer/y1984isepp3-12nv.70no.5.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

An investigation of cash management practices and their effects on the demand for money

Author

Listed:
  • Michael Dotsey

Abstract

The observed shift in statistical demand-for-money relationships during the mid-1970s was once thought to reflect an unexplainable change in behavior. More recently, economists have recognized that the conventional regressions inadequately represented the demand for money. Specifically, the standard models overpredicted money demand during the 1970s since they failed to capture the effects of sophisticated cash management techniques. In “An Investigation of Cash Management Practices and Their Effects on the Demand for Money,” Michael Dotsey examines ways of augmenting the conventional models to overcome this problem. By looking at the causes of changes in cash management practices, Dotsey finds four variables related to cash management, which he tests for ability to explain the mid-1970s shift in a standard regression explaining the demand for money. Each of the proxies reduces the instability of the equation. Indeed, one such proxy, the number of electronic funds transfers over the Federal Reserve’s wire system, captures the entire shift in the conventional model in the 1970s.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Dotsey, 1984. "An investigation of cash management practices and their effects on the demand for money," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Sep, pages 3-12.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedrer:y:1984:i:sep:p:3-12:n:v.70no.5
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://fraser.stlouisfed.org/files/docs/publications/frbrichreview/rev_frbrich198409.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Carlson, John A & Frew, James R, 1980. "Money Demand Responsiveness to the Rate of Return on Money: A Methodological Critique," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 88(3), pages 598-607, June.
    2. Lieberman, Charles, 1977. "The Transactions Demand for Money and Technological Change," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 59(3), pages 307-317, August.
    3. Richard D. Porter & Thomes D. Simpson & Eileen Mauskopf, 1979. "Financial Innovation and the Monetary Aggregates," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 10(1), pages 213-230.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Cole, Harold L. & Ohanian, Lee E., 2002. "Shrinking money: the demand for money and the nonneutrality of money," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(4), pages 653-686, May.
    2. Ireland, Peter N, 1995. "Endogenous Financial Innovation and the Demand for Money," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 27(1), pages 107-123, February.
    3. Uribe, Martin, 1997. "Hysteresis in a simple model of currency substitution," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 185-202, September.
    4. Harold L. Cole & Lee E. Ohanian, 1997. "Shrinking money and monetary business cycles," Working Papers 579, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    5. Elena Sinelnikova-Muryleva, 2011. "Innovations in the sphere of payments and the money demand in Russia," Research Paper Series, Gaidar Institute for Economic Policy, issue 157P.
    6. Duca, John V. & VanHoose, David D., 2004. "Recent developments in understanding the demand for money," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 56(4), pages 247-272.
    7. Sturzenegger, Federico, 1997. "Understanding the welfare implications of currency substitution," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 21(2-3), pages 391-416.
    8. Harold L. Cole & Lee E. Ohanian, 1998. "The demand for money and the nonneutrality of money," Staff Report 246, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Money;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedrer:y:1984:i:sep:p:3-12:n:v.70no.5. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Christian Pascasio). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/frbrius.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.