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Antitrust analysis in banking : goals, methods, and justifications in a changed environment

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  • John R. Walter
  • Patricia E. Wescott

Abstract

During recent decades banking markets have changed considerably. Nevertheless, banking antitrust analysis continues to follow the same basic philosophy laid down 40 years ago by the Supreme Court. Does the change in banking markets imply the need to alter antitrust analysis in banking? This article reviews the methods of antitrust analysis and discusses justifications for them. The article concludes that the means of analysis continues to make sense regardless of a changed environment.

Suggested Citation

  • John R. Walter & Patricia E. Wescott, 2008. "Antitrust analysis in banking : goals, methods, and justifications in a changed environment," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Win, pages 45-72.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedreq:y:2008:i:win:p:45-72:n:v.94no.1
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    File URL: http://www.richmondfed.org/publications/economic_research/economic_quarterly/pdfs/winter2008/walter.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. David VanHoose, 2008. "Policy Implications of Endogenous Sunk Fixed Costs in Banking: Has U.S. Antitrust Policy Been on the Wrong Track?," NFI Policy Briefs 2008-PB-06, Indiana State University, Scott College of Business, Networks Financial Institute.

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    Keywords

    Banks and banking ; Antitrust law;

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