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Inflation and changing expenditure shares

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  • Fan Ding
  • Alexander L. Wolman

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Suggested Citation

  • Fan Ding & Alexander L. Wolman, 2005. "Inflation and changing expenditure shares," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, vol. 91(Win), pages 1-20.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedreq:y:2005:i:win:p:1-20:n:v.91no.1
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    File URL: http://www.richmondfed.org/publications/research/economic_quarterly/2005/winter/pdf/wolmanding.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Erceg, Christopher J. & Levin, Andrew T., 2002. "Optimal monetary policy with durable and non-durable goods," Working Paper Series 179, European Central Bank.
    2. Andrew T. Levin & Jeremy M. Piger, 2003. "Is inflation persistence intrinsic in industrial economies?," Working Papers 2002-023, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    3. Mark Bils & Peter J. Klenow, 2004. "Some Evidence on the Importance of Sticky Prices," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 112(5), pages 947-985, October.
    4. Alexander L. Wolman, 1999. "Sticky prices, marginal cost, and the behavior of inflation," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Fall, pages 29-48.
    5. Roy H. Webb, 2004. "Which price index should a central bank employ?," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, vol. 90(Spr), pages 63-76.
    6. Todd E. Clark, 1999. "A comparison of the CPI and the PCE price index," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, vol. 84(Q III), pages 15-29.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Keywords

    Inflation (Finance);

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