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Has globalization created a borderless world?

  • Janet Ceglowski
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    Globalization. The word often conjures up an image of a worldwide society--no boundaries, no borders, no barriers. Economically speaking, in a truly borderless world, financial capital, production activities, and labor would flow as easily between countries as they do within a country. But is this picture of an economic "global village" accurate? Not quite, according to Janet Ceglowski. In this article, she explains why, despite the expansion of international economic activity in recent years, we haven't yet achieved a barrier-free world

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    Article provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia in its journal Business Review.

    Volume (Year): (1998)
    Issue (Month): Mar ()
    Pages: 17-27

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    Handle: RePEc:fip:fedpbr:y:1998:i:mar:p:17-27
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    1. Engel, C. & Rogers, J.H., 1996. "Regional Patterns in the Law of One Price: The Roles of Geography vs. Currencies," Working Papers 96-01, University of Washington, Department of Economics.
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    7. Shang-Jin Wei, 1996. "Intra-National versus International Trade: How Stubborn are Nations in Global Integration?," NBER Working Papers 5531, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Charles Engel & John H. Rogers, 1995. "How wide is the border?," Research Working Paper 95-09, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
    9. French, Kenneth R & Poterba, James M, 1991. "Investor Diversification and International Equity Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(2), pages 222-26, May.
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    11. Rauch, James E., 1999. "Networks versus markets in international trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 7-35, June.
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