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Remarks on the measurement, valuation, and reporting of intangible assets

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  • Baruch Lev

Abstract

This paper was presented at the conference "Economic Statistics: New Needs for the Twenty-First Century," cosponsored by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, the Conference on Research in Income and Wealth, and the National Association for Business Economics, July 11, 2002. Intangible assets are both large and important. However, current financial statements provide very little information about these assets. Even worse, much of the information that is provided is partial, inconsistent, and confusing, leading to significant costs to companies, to investors, and to society as a whole. Solving this problem will require on-balance-sheet accounting for many of these assets as well as additional financial disclosures. These gains can be achieved, but only if users of financial information insist upon improvements to corporate reporting.

Suggested Citation

  • Baruch Lev, 2003. "Remarks on the measurement, valuation, and reporting of intangible assets," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Sep, pages 17-22.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednep:y:2003:i:sep:p:17-22:n:v.9no.3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Louis K. C. Chan, 2001. "The Stock Market Valuation of Research and Development Expenditures," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(6), pages 2431-2456, December.
    2. Leonard I. Nakamura, 2001. "What is the U.S. gross investment in intangibles? (At least) one trillion dollars a year!," Working Papers 01-15, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    3. David Aboody & Baruch Lev, 2000. "Information Asymmetry, R&D, and Insider Gains," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 55(6), pages 2747-2766, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Daria Ciriaci, 2011. "Intangible resources: the relevance of training for European firms’ innovative performance," JRC Working Papers on Corporate R&D and Innovation 2011-06, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    2. Shigeki Sakakibara & Bo Hansson & Tadanori Yosano & Hideo Kozumi, 2010. "Analysts’ Perceptions of Intellectual Capital Information," Australian Accounting Review, CPA Australia, vol. 20(3), pages 274-285, September.
    3. Paugam, Luc, 2011. "Valorisation et reporting du goodwill : enjeux théoriques et empiriques," Economics Thesis from University Paris Dauphine, Paris Dauphine University, number 123456789/8007 edited by Casta, Jean-François.
    4. Simon Price, 2004. "UK investment and the return to equity: Q redux," Money Macro and Finance (MMF) Research Group Conference 2004 87, Money Macro and Finance Research Group.
    5. Simon Price & Christoph Schleicher, 2006. "Returns to equity, investment and Q: evidence from the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 310, Bank of England.
    6. Luc Paugam & Jean-François Casta, 2010. "Mesurer le capital organisationnel comme combinaison de ressources," Post-Print halshs-00494560, HAL.
    7. Demetrios Eliades & Olaf Weeken, 2005. "The stock market and capital accumulation: an application to UK data," Bank of England working papers 251, Bank of England.
    8. Charles R. Hulten & Xiaohui Hao, 2008. "What is a Company Really Worth? Intangible Capital and the "Market to Book Value" Puzzle," NBER Working Papers 14548, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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    Keywords

    Asset pricing;

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