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Unequal incomes, unequal outcomes? Economic inequality and measures of well-being, closing discussion: social policy implications, general commentary

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  • Timothy Smeeding

Abstract

This paper was presented at the conference "Unequal incomes, unequal outcomes? Economic inequality and measures of well-being" as part of the closing discussion, "Social policy implications." The conference was held at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York on May 7, 1999. The author advocates the need to examine further the effectiveness of policy responses to inequality. He identifies three broad categories of policy responses worthy of study: policies aimed at investing in public goods to enhance human capital, policies that reward socially acceptable actions and provide economic mobility by increasing incomes (such as earned income tax credits), and policies that assist those individuals with the most serious physical and mental disabilities.

Suggested Citation

  • Timothy Smeeding, 1999. "Unequal incomes, unequal outcomes? Economic inequality and measures of well-being, closing discussion: social policy implications, general commentary," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Sep, pages 175-177.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednep:y:1999:i:sep:p:175-177:n:v.5no.3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Peter Gottschalk, 1997. "Inequality, Income Growth, and Mobility: The Basic Facts," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(2), pages 21-40, Spring.
    2. Martin Feldstein, 1998. "Income Inequality and Poverty," NBER Working Papers 6770, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Finis Welch, 1999. "In Defense of Inequality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 1-17.
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    Keywords

    Income distribution ; Public policy;

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